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Annex III: Military Recruiting and Recruiter Irregularities

Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor


Military Recruiting and Recruiter Irregularities

Report for 2006

The All-Volunteer Force (AVF) has served the nation for over 30 years, providing a military that is experienced, well-trained, disciplined, and representative of America. Service recruiters are asked to seek out the best and brightest of America's youth to staff the AVF. These recruiters have answered the call working long and unusual hours at great sacrifice to their families.

Since recruiters are often the only exposure that many communities have to members of the military, it is critical that they represent the military and their Service in a very professional and ethical manner. While the overwhelming majority of recruiters are most ethical, a very small number choose to engage in inappropriate recruiting techniques in their attempts to enlist new members. These actions negatively affect all of the Services' recruiting efforts and each of the Services takes this issue very seriously.

TABLE 1. Accessions and Number of Claims

Fiscal Year

2006

DoD Total Accessions

317,866

Claims

2,456

Claims Substantiated

518

% of Accessions w/Substantiated Claims

0.16%

Army Accessions

184,056

Claims

1,618

Claims Substantiated

265

% of Accessions w/Substantiated Claims

0.14%

Marine Corps Accessions

40,393

Claims

192

Claims Substantiated

97

% of Accessions w/Substantiated Claims

0.24%

Navy Accessions

46,401

Claims

445

Claims Substantiated

132

% of Accessions w/Substantiated Claims

0.28%

Air Force Accessions

47,016

Claims

201

Claims Substantiated

24

% of Accessions w/Substantiated Claims

0.05%

Note: Accessions include non-prior service and prior service accessions and are a total of Active, Guard, and Reserve Components

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) report (MILITARY RECRUITING: DOD and Services Need Better Data to Enhance Visibility over Recruiter Irregularities, GAO-06-846, August 2006) made several recommendation on how the Department could do a better job tracking and reporting recruiter irregularities. To this end, the Department formed a working group to standardize the terms and reporting requirements across the Services. This report is the first that applies GAO's recommendations as well as the Services' input and will provide the Department better oversight regarding recruiter irregularities.

In Table 1, the new Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) guidelines were used to compare the number of substantiated claims to the total number of accessions. Department-wide, less than one-fifth of one percent of our accessions (518 out of 317,866) were involved in a substantiated claim of recruiter irregularity. While we strive for zero irregularities this number, when put in perspective, is extremely low.

TABLE 2a. Substantiated Claims by Type, 2006

Fiscal Year

Substantiated Claims

% of Claims

DoD

Number of Substantiated Claims

518

100.0%

Claim Type

Criminal Misconduct

19

3.7%

Sexual Misconduct

23

4.4%

Sexual Harassment

3

0.6%

Fraternization/Unauthorized Relationship w/Applicant

74

14.3%

Concealment, Falsification, or Undue Influence

288

55.6%

Testing Irregularity

16

3.1%

False Promise/Coercion

17

3.3%

QC Measures

78

15.1%

TABLE 2b. Substantiated Claims by Type and by Service

Army

Navy

Number of Substantiated Claims

265

100.0%

Number of Substantiated Claims

132

100.0%

Claim Type

Claim Type

Criminal Misconduct

3

1.1%

Criminal Misconduct

0

0.0%

Sexual Misconduct

10

3.8%

Sexual Misconduct

0

0.0%

Sexual Harassment

0

0.0%

Sexual Harassment

3

2.3%

Fraternization/Unauthorized Relationship w/Applicant

42

15.8%

Fraternization/Unauthorized Relationship w/Applicant

7

5.3%

Concealment, Falsification, or Undue Influence

177

66.8%

Concealment, Falsification, or Undue Influence

54

40.9%

Testing Irregularity

7

2.6%

Testing Irregularity

5

3.8%

False Promise/Coercion

4

1.5%

False Promise/Coercion

10

7.6%

QC Measures

22

8.3%

QC Measures

53

40.2%

Marine Corps

Air Force

Number of Substantiated Claims

97

100.0%

Number of Substantiated Claims

24

100.0%

Claim Type

Claim Type

Criminal Misconduct

11

11.3%

Criminal Misconduct

5

20.8%

Sexual Misconduct

11

11.3%

Sexual Misconduct

2

8.3%

Sexual Harassment

0

0.0%

Sexual Harassment

0

0.0%

Fraternization/Unauthorized Relationship w/Applicant

20

20.6%

Fraternization/Unauthorized Relationship w/Applicant

5

20.8%

Concealment, Falsification, or Undue Influence

46

47.4%

Concealment, Falsification, or Undue Influence

11

45.8%

Testing Irregularity

4

4.1%

Testing Irregularity

0

0.0%

False Promise/Coercion

3

3.1%

False Promise/Coercion

0

0.0%

QC Measures

2

2.1%

QC Measures

1

4.2%

The Department understands that behind these claims are young men or women who are excited about serving their country. Any inappropriate action taken by a recruiter that negatively impacts the processing of these young people is a concern and is inconsistent with our values. Table 2a shows that DoD-wide, more than three quarters (77%) of substantiated claims resulted not from inappropriate criminal or sexual misconduct, but instead from recruiters concealing/falsifying information or not paying close enough attention in the quality control aspects of the contracting process.

When incidents of recruiter irregularity occur, the Services have mechanisms in place to remedy violations and limit future occurrences. Each Service has an office that provides recruiter oversight regarding misconduct and unethical behavior. Unethical behavior not only breaks down the recruiting process, but it also fosters distrust of the military. Such distrust makes recruiting for all even more difficult. Recruiters guilty of recruiting improprieties are subject to punishment under the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Possible punishments range from a court martial to non-adverse administrative action depending on the severity of the offense and the recruiter's record of service.

The Department will continue to monitor this issue to help minimize the occurrences of recruiter irregularities. It is important to remember that the military Services employed approximately 22,000 production recruiters who accessed almost 318,000 young men and women for the active and reserve forces in FY2006. These recruiters have earned and deserve America's respect.


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