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 You are in: Bureaus/Offices Reporting Directly to the Secretary > Office of the Coordinator for Counterterrorism > Releases > Fact Sheets > 2004
Fact Sheet
Office of the Coordinator for Counterterrorism
Washington, DC
June 22, 2004

Chronology of Non-Significant International Terrorist Incidents, 2003 (Revised 6/22/04)

Note: The U.S. Government’s Incident Review Panel (IRP) has determined that the following incidents meet the criteria for non-significant international terrorist incidents. An International Terrorist Incident is judged non-significant if it does not result in a loss of life or serious injury to persons, major property damage (more than $10,000), and/or is not an act or attempted act that could reasonably be expected to create the conditions noted.

January

22 Colombia
On 22 January 2003, in Arauquita, Colombia, military officials reported that militants from either the National Liberation Army (ELN) or the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) bombed a section of the Cano Limon-Covenas oil pipeline, causing an unknown amount of damage. The pipeline is owned by both U.S. and Colombian oil companies.

February

1 Turkey
On 1 February 2003, in Istanbul, Turkey, press reports stated that a time bomb had been discovered in a McDonald's restaurant. A cleaning man identified the explosive device, noting a timer and cables attached to a box under a table. The authorities were notified immediately, and police defused the explosive. No casualties were reported, and no one claimed responsibility. The device had a timer that was not functional, and the pipe bomb was amateurish. Therefore, it would not have caused significant damage.

6 Colombia
On 6 February 2003, in Arauquita, Colombia, military officials reported either the National Liberation Army (ELN) or the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) militants bombed a section of the Cano Limon-Covenas oil pipeline, causing an unknown amount of oil to spill. The pipeline is owned by both U.S. and Colombian oil companies.

13 United Kingdom
On 13 February 2003, in the United Kingdom, a person arriving on a British Airways flight was arrested when a hand grenade was found concealed in his luggage, according to press reports. The man, a Venezuelan of Bangladeshi origin, was arrested under the Terrorism Act by officers from Sussex Police and later charged by authorities. The flight, BA 2048 from Bogota, Colombia, with a stop in Caracas, Venezuela, landed at Gatwick Airport. The discovery caused the closure of the North Terminal for approximately two hours.

15 Colombia
On 15 February 2003, in Saravena, Colombia, military officials reported either the National Liberation Army (ELN) or the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) militants bombed a section of the Cano Limon-Covenas oil pipeline, causing an unquantified oil spill. The pipeline is owned by both U.S. and Colombian oil companies.

22 Turkey
On 22 February 2003, in Istanbul, Turkey, two unidentified persons threw a bomb into a British Airways office at 1:20 AM resulting in shattered windows. There were no casualties reported, and no one claimed responsibility.

March

9 India

On 9 March 2003, in Sogam, Kashmir, India, a student was injured by a bomb, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

20 Greece
On 20 March 2003, in Kholargos, Greece, militants placed four gas canisters at the entrance to the Citibank then set them on fire, causing minor damage. No one claimed responsibility.

21 Norway
Early on 21 March 2003, in Oslo, Norway, anti-war protesters threw a Molotov cocktail into a McDonald's restaurant before opening time, causing limited damage. Nobody was hurt in the attack.

23 Ecuador
On the night of 23 March 2003, in Guayaquil, Ecuador, a bomb exploded at the United Kingdom consulate. Although it did not cause serious damage or personal injury, the explosion left a hole in the ground, destroyed two windows and a bathroom, and damaged the building's electrical control board. The People's Revolutionary Militias group (MRP) sent an email claiming responsibility for the attack.

25 Lebanon
On 25 March 2003, in Beirut, Lebanon, television reports stated that an explosive device weighing approximately 400 grams was detonated at the British Council. No casualties were reported, but the building sustained light damage. No one claimed responsibility.

30 Bosnia
On 30 March 2003, in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Islamic extremists placed a hand grenade with an anti-American message near a local Coca-Cola company. No one claimed responsibility.

31 Cyprus
On 31 March 2003, in Nicosia, Cyprus, a 26-year-old man hurled a Molotov cocktail against the outside wall of the U.S. Embassy. No damages were reported. Police quickly arrested the culprit in connection with this incident.

31 Italy
On 31 March 2003, in Bologna, Italy, IBM company employees found an explosive device in a large bag and notified the police. Upon arrival, the bomb squad found a "dangerous, though rudimentary" bomb. Anti-terrorism investigators established an easy link between the modus operandi of this incident and a prior bombing incident that took place in July of 2001 in Bologna. No one claimed responsibility for placing the bomb.

April

3 Turkey

On 3 April 2003, in Istanbul, Turkey, a "high pressure resonance bomb" detonated near a United Parcel Service (UPS) building, smashing the windows of a pharmacy and nearby olive-seller's shop. The explosion caused minor damage to the wall that surrounds the UPS building, as well as a nearby transformer. No one claimed responsibility.

8 Turkey
On 8 April 2003, in Izmir, Turkey, concussion grenades placed before the Bornova Court, City Bank, and the British Consulate went off, causing property damage. Nobody was hurt in these attacks. Two suspects charged in the bombings were reportedly members of the Marxist-Leninist Communist Party (MLKP).

10 Germany
On 10 April 2003, in Hamburg, Germany, unknown perpetrators set fire to a party bus for children in the parking lot of a McDonald's restaurant and then set fire to a McDonald's billboard. At both sites fliers of a left-wing extremist group were found. The extent of property damage was not known. An investigation was underway.

10 India
On 10 April 2003, in Kashmir, India, a bomb exploded in the famous Mughal Garden causing no damage, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

22 Argentina
On 22 April 2003, at 0200 hours, in Avellaneda, Argentina, a homemade bomb exploded in front of a McDonald's restaurant on Mitre Avenue and Berutti Street. Security officials found an iron tank about 30 centimeters long, as well as evidence of gunpowder. The explosion shattered the windows, but did not damage the interior of the restaurant. No injuries were reported. No one claimed responsibility for the attack.

May

4 Turkey

Throughout the night of 4 May 2003, in Adana, Turkey, a series of five bombs exploded, resulting in minor property damage, but no casualties. A United Parcel Service office, Tommy Hilfiger store, local Turkish bank, the American Consulate, and the Nationalist Turkish Political Party headquarters were targeted. No one claimed responsibility for the attack.

15 Pakistan
On 15 May 2003, in Karachi, Pakistan, 19 small bombs exploded at Shell stations, an Anglo Dutch owned company, two Caltex petrol stations, and a subsidiary of U.S. giant Caltex, injuring seven persons, according to press reports. The small bombs - firecrackers fitted with timing devices - were packed into boxes placed in garbage bins and appeared aimed to scare. Muslim United Army group claimed responsibility in a faxed letter to the newspaper Dawn.

31 India
On 31 May 2003, in Khudwani, Kashmir, India, a grenade exploded, injuring 11 civilians and 2 police officers, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

June

1 Afghanistan

On 1 June 2003, in Kandahar, Afghanistan, a bomb exploded at a German NGO office, Deutsche Gesellschaft Fuer Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH, causing minor damage to the building, according to press reports. The building was closed for the weekend, resulting in no injuries. Al-Qaida may be responsible.

July

11 Greece

On 11 July 2003, in Athens, Greece, a bomb planted in an office building near a branch of the American Life Insurance Company (ALICO) was safely dismantled by authorities, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility though the device was similar to others produced by the Revolutionary Nuclei and ELA terrorists groups.

13 Greece
On 13 July 2003, in Athens, Greece, three Molotov cocktails were thrown at a branch office of the Eurobank, causing minor damage, according to Embassy reporting. No one claimed responsibility.

16 Colombia
On 16 July 2003, between the towns of Samora and Vanadia, Colombia, armed militants set off several bombs damaging transmission line towers that cut off electricity to the whole province, according to press reports. The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) is probably responsible for this attack.

16 Colombia
On 16 July 2003, in La Pesquera, Colombia, it was reported that militants bombed a section of the oil pipeline at the KM 71 and 26 W intersection, causing an unknown amount of damage. The Cano Limon-Covenas pipeline is owned by both U.S. and Colombian oil companies.

23 Sri Lanka
On 23 July 2003, in Valachchenai, Sri Lanka, militants stoned a vehicle carrying two Scandinavians working as truce monitors, according to press reports. The truce monitors were not injured, but their car was damaged. No one claimed responsibility.

August

No non-significant incidents to report.

September

9 Iran
On 9 September 2003, in Tehran, Iran, armed militants fired three to four shots at the British Embassy, causing no damage or injuries, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

15 Iran
On 15 September 2003, in Tehran, Iran, shots were fired at the British Embassy, causing no injuries, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

October

No non-significant incidents to report.

November

4 Netherlands
On 4 November 2003, at The Hague, the Netherlands, an unidentified person set off a firebomb at the Turkish Embassy. According to press reports, no one was wounded. No one claimed responsibility.

5 Afghanistan
On 5 November 2003, in Kabul, Afghanistan, a bomb exploded next to the offices of the international aid agencies, Oxfam and Save the Children, causing no casualties, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

21 Iran
On 21 November 2003, in Tehran, Iran, a firebomb was thrown at the British Embassy, causing no injuries and little damage, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

December

No non-significant incidents to report.


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