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Confidence and Security Building Measures
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Confidence and Security Building Measures

Western Hemisphere, The AmericasEuropeCentral AsiaMiddle East and North AfricaEast Asia and the PacificAfricaClickable Map of Confidence and Security Building Measures' Regions -- alternate links at left of screen
[The Americas | Africa | Central Asia | Europe
East Asia and the PacificThe Middle East 
 
The United Nations]

Discussions on Confidence and Security Building Measures (CSBMs)* are ongoing across the globe in the Americas, Africa, Europe, East Asia and the Pacific, and the Middle East. Some of these regions are at peace; others have deep histories of conflict and mistrust. Despite such differences, all of these regions are exploring ways to keep peace and create greater security through democracy, economic integration, arms control, and most notably through the development and adoption of Confidence and Security Building Measures.

Throughout history, humans, in their interactions with one another, have sought to dispel distrust and build confidence through symbolic gestures that prove peaceful intentions. Similarly, Confidence and Security Building Measures seek to reduce or eliminate the causes of mistrust, fear, tension, and hostility amongst modern states. CSBMs increase openness and transparency in military activities and in arms acquisitions, thus increasing the predictability of other states' actions and behavior. Under a successful CSBMs arrangement, normal military activities are not mistakenly perceived as threatening. In addition, military activities that do pose a threat are immediately identifiable as out of the ordinary, allowing time for a state to seek clarification or react militarily if necessary.

Today, CSBMs are being examined and adopted in many regions of the world. Click on a region of the world to find out about CSBMs in that region.

For more information, contact the AC Special Adviser at 202-647-3799.

*NOTE: In early 2004, the Confidence and Security Building Measures office was moved from the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs to the Bureau of Arms Control.

  
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