U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
Other State Department Archive SitesU.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
Home Issues & Press Travel & Business Countries Youth & Education Careers About State Video
 You are in: Under Secretary for Democracy and Global Affairs > Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs > Releases > Other Releases > 2004

Joint Statement by the United States and South Africa Following the First Meeting of the Bilateral Working Group on Climate Change


Cape Town, South Africa
February 25, 2004

Following is the text of a joint statement released by the U.S. and South Africa following the first meeting of the Bilateral Working Group on Climate Change in Cape Town on February 25, 2004. Dr. Harlan Watson, U.S. Department of State Senior Climate Negotiator and Special Representative, led the U.S. delegation and Dr. Crispian Olver, Director General of the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, led the South African delegation.

[Begin Text]

The governments of South Africa and the United States convened the first meeting of the Bilateral Working Group on Climate Change at the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT), in Cape Town on February 25, 2004. The meeting was conducted in response to the commitment by both governments to expand and intensify their existing bilateral efforts to address climate change.

Dr. Crispian Olver, Director General of the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism and Dr. Harlan Watson, U.S. Department of State Senior Climate Negotiator and Special Representative led the respective delegations. Also participating was Vice Admiral Conrad Lautenbacher, Under Secretary and Administrator, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. Department of Commerce.

The South African team included representatives from the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism and South African Weather Services. The U.S. team included experts from the U.S. Department of Commerce-National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the U.S. Department of State.

The two sides discussed activities in the seven areas that were identified in the 2003 U.S.-South Africa Joint Statement on Climate Change: renewable energy; energy efficiency; carbon sequestration; clean energy technology; impact assessment and adaptation options; carbon cycle monitoring; and, economic modeling. U.S. and South African representatives also discussed additional areas of integrated observation systems and data, air quality management, and coal-bed methane.

For each area, the South African and U.S. representatives reviewed ongoing cooperative activities, and explored potential new activities. Topics included joint projects as well as coordinated activities that are part of larger international programs:

  • Collection of atmospheric carbon cycle data in northern South Africa through a cooperative program using instrumented aircraft and a tall tower.
  • Economic modeling, including development of a methodology to achieve reduction in GHG levels through the application of industrial energy management measures;
  • Regional adaptation pilot projects to increase resilience to climate-related change of water or agricultural programs in South Africa, with a regional outreach component to other Southern African neighbors.
  • Upgrading aerosol measurements at the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Station at Cape Point, South Africa through installation of new equipment, training of personnel and quality assurance site audits.
  • Science and technology research and development for carbon capture, sequestration and storage solutions, both bilaterally and under the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum and related activities;
  • Project on capacity building and adaptation to environmental change designed to support adaptation of local coastal communities to climatic and environmental changes in the coastal zone of South Africa and neighboring countries.
  • Energy efficiency through cooperative development of technical standards in areas such as voluntary energy performance standards for commercial buildings.
Both delegations reviewed the outcome of COP-9, and agreed on the importance of continued multilateral efforts to address the problem of climate change.

South African and U.S. participants agreed that periodic meetings would help to ensure continued close cooperation in addressing climate change. The U.S. will host the next meeting of the Working Group.

[End Text]


Released on March 2, 2004

  Back to top

U.S. Department of State
USA.govU.S. Department of StateUpdates  |   Frequent Questions  |   Contact Us  |   Email this Page  |   Subject Index  |   Search
The Office of Electronic Information, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department. External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.
About state.gov  |   Privacy Notice  |   FOIA  |   Copyright Information  |   Other U.S. Government Information

Published by the U.S. Department of State Website at http://www.state.gov maintained by the Bureau of Public Affairs.