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Intervention of the United States: Meeting of the Subsidiary Body on Implementation

Delegation of the United States
Fourteenth Session of the Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change
Poznan, Poland
December 2, 2008

Thank you, Mister Chairman.

The United States welcomes the opportunity to speak on the issue of capacity building under the Framework Convention. We view country-driven capacity building as key to the effective implementation of the UNFCCC by all Parties.

We were pleased by the accomplishments of the group at SBI-28, resulting in the development of decision text that has been forwarded here to Poznan for our ministers. We noted the submissions by Parties and the Secretariat’s synthesis report, as well as the just-released technical paper and report from the workshop on monitoring and evaluating capacity building work at the national level. We were pleased to make a lengthy submission on U.S. experiences on monitoring and evaluating capacity building and to share that experience with other Parties at the recent Rio workshop, and were delighted that you were able to join us in Rio, Mr. Chairman.

As you know Mr. Chairman, this group has struggled to find a constructive way forward in our work. The United States remains interested in finding a balance between undertaking the actual important work of capacity building itself and identifying a practical approach to the complex matter of monitoring and evaluating the implementation of the framework appended to decision 2/CP.7. Other Parties seem to be very keen to create elaborate global scale indicators that could be used to evaluate the implementation of the framework appended to decision 2/CP.7. However, even significant donor Parties like the United States – with extensive capacity building efforts worldwide – have not identified national level indicators, working instead with project level indicators. We noted with disappointment that only a few other Parties opted to present during the workshop in Rio, and we believe this is indicative of a general lack of experience with national level approaches.

Amid all these challenges, in an effort to find common ground with Parties interested in using indicators, we and other delegations have identified an organization where experts have come together and identified a set of global indicators that might be useful to our group and could help us to move forward on the path to a solution. The OECD’s Development Assistance Committee, known as the DAC, has secured the agreement of 123 countries – developed and developing alike – to the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness. The group has just released a study on the results achieved since 2005 of their “managing for results” approach. This work sounds very interesting to us since their efforts at exploring aid effectiveness would appear to have some potential to assist us in our work and address the concerns of some Parties. As a result, the United States requested the Secretariat to invite a DAC speaker to brief delegates in Poznan; unfortunately we were informed that the Secretariat was not able to do so. Nonetheless, we remain hopeful that we will be able to benefit from the DAC’s experiences and lessons learned, as they seem very promising, in the area of capacity building and aid effectiveness.

We look forward to working constructively with other Parties here in Poznan on this important agenda item.

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.



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