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Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration
Symposium on Post-Conflict Property Restitution
  

Symposium on Post-Conflict Property Restitution

Symposium on Post-Conflict Property Restitution
Hosted by the United States Department of State
September 6-7, 2007
Arlington, Virginia

Over the last few decades, the issue of property restitution has become increasingly important. The United States Government in general and the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) in particular have taken the lead in trying to solve this problem, specifically as property loss impacts refugees. The Bureau actively supports international and non-governmental organizations dedicated to ensuring that refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) are able to return to their homes or receive restitution.

In many involuntary migration situations, property claims and losses are complicated on many levels. For example, as displaced people return to their homes, they expect to reclaim properties that often have been inhabited by others who themselves might have been displaced. Therefore, in order to not only resolve the immediate property issues but to prevent recurrent conflict, it is critical to ensure that a mechanism is created that everyone perceives is just.

PRM and the Office of the Coordinator of Reconstruction and Stabilization (S/CRS) hosted a symposium on this subject, bringing together experts representing a broad spectrum of the donor and aid community with a wealth of theoretical and practical experience to exchange ideas and approaches. The aim of the symposium was to influence policies, improve practices and share information about best practices with implementers and policy makers.

The symposium was organized into nine sessions covering five country case studies (Bosnia, Kosovo, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Liberia) as well as four dealing with the cross-cutting topics of: commercial Property, commissions versus court adjudication, enforcement, and international/national oversight.

Included in this collection of materials is the agenda, some background articles, and bios of experts and authors of articles. The information contained herein is provided by the authors and is not to be construed as official U.S. Government policy.

--12/21/07  Biographical Informationof Panel Presenters and Respondents
--12/15/05  Strategy on Housing and Property Rights for Sustainable Return  [58 Kb]
--10/22/07  Operationalising the Right of Displaced Persons to ReturnHhome and to Recover Possessions  [36 Kb]
--  Position Paper: Pinheiro Principles; UN Prinicples on Housing and Property Restitution for Refugees and Displaced Persons  [898 Kb]
--  Position Paper: Case Against the Republic of Croatia lodged Under the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms  [193 Kb]
--10/10/07  Position Paper: International Peace Academy: Housing, Land, Property and Conflict Management  [164 Kb]
--09/06/07  Position Paper: COHRE Arraiza Property Restitution in Kosovo  [2775 Kb]
--06/01/06  Position Paper: United Nations University: The Gender Dimensions of Post-Coflict Reconstruction  [126 Kb]
--09/06/07  Position Paper: Peter Van der Auweraert: Property Restitution in Iraq  [177 Kb]
--09/02/07  Position Paper: Norwegian Refugee Council: DC Symposium on Post-Conflict Property Restitution  [89 Kb]
--12/21/07  Agenda With Presenters
--12/21/07  Executive Summary: Session 1 - 9

  
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