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Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons Bureau Strategic Plan FY 2009

Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons
Washington, DC
June 20, 2007

FY 2007-2012 Department of State and USAID Strategic Plan

Contents
Ambassador's Statement
State Operations Overview
Goal Papers
Goal #1: Prosecution
Goal #2: Protection
Goal #3: Prevention
Goal #4: Interagency Coordination
Goal #5: Professional Development
FY 2009 State Operations Summary
Appendix A - Acronyms

Ambassador's Statement

Overview

Human trafficking is an offense against human dignity, a crime in which human beings, many of them teenagers and young children, are bought and sold and often sexually abused by violent criminals. Our nation is determined to fight and end this modern form of slavery. --President George W. Bush, January, 2006

Trafficking in persons (TIP) and human trafficking are euphemisms for modern-day slavery. Around the world, people are coerced into indentured servitude including bonded labor, bought and sold in prostitution, and captured to serve as child soldiers, domestic workers, and farm laborers.

Estimates of the number of TIP victims vary widely. According to USG estimates, approximately 800,000 people are trafficked across international borders each year. About 80 percent are female and up to half are minors. These figures do not include millions who are trafficked into labor and sexual slavery within national borders.

The United States has emerged as the global leader in calling the world's attention to the ongoing existence of slavery. Fundamentally, human trafficking deprives people of their most basic human rights and strips them of human dignity. It is a public health catastrophe, crippling and traumatizing victims, often in their youth, while spreading diseases including malaria, TB, and HIV/AIDS. It fosters crimes of violence, particularly crimes of sexual violence. And it is a threat to national security. Because human trafficking relies on corruption and fraud to succeed, it weakens the rule of law, inviting organized crime to flourish. In the President's 2006 National Security Strategy, for the first time, human trafficking is specified as a global threat.

The United States has earned respect around the globe for our efforts to eradicate trafficking in persons. No other government, or international organization for that matter, devotes as much to this effort -whether funding for anti-trafficking programs, or issuing regular public reports on global anti-trafficking efforts. The lead government advocate on the issue in the world is the Department's Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (G/TIP) established in October 2001 pursuant to the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) of 2000. This office has four primary functions; managing anti-trafficking funds; compiling the largest government-produced annual Trafficking in Persons Report (TIP Report); advancing public awareness and advocacy involving practical solutions to nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), international organizations, Congress, and the media; and coordinating and chairing an interagency process guiding USG anti-trafficking policy and programs--all toward the goal of eradicating this form of modern-day slavery. All these activities focus on the three-P paradigm of prosecution of traffickers, protection of victims, and prevention of TIP, as outlined in the TVPA.

Foreign Policy Priorities

Transformational diplomacy requires trafficking in persons as a growing global crime, because it profoundly undermines the objectives of 'peace and security' and 'governing justly and democratically'. For the purpose of maximizing funding potential G/TIP should be identified under only one objective in the strategic framework and has requested to be moved from 'peace and security' to 'governing justly and democratically' because human trafficking is a transnational problem-- affecting source, transit, and destination countries and it thrives in countries that lack rule of law and effective justice systems. The exploiters and enablers (i.e., corrupt government officials and military personnel) must be stigmatized, prosecuted, and punished to deter this crime. A movement of faith-based groups, feminists, champions inside governments, advocates in international agencies, and brave individuals, working alone or through NGOs, have closed ranks to do so. G/TIP will continue to work with other bureaus in the Department, other federal agencies and private partners to address the following foreign policy priorities for the current planning period of FY 2007-2009.

G/TIP's priorities are structured around the three-P paradigm of prosecution, protection and prevention. The underlying goal of all our work in G/TIP is to stimulate other governments to take action that will lead to the eradication of trafficking in persons. The annual TIP Report lays out a blueprint for how other governments can take tangible steps to improve in the three-P areas. Our overall strategy is to link programming with the results of the annual TIP Report to assist foreign governments in taking the needed action. As such, the TIP Report is not just an assessment, or a tool for diplomatic leverage, but a roadmap for priorities in funding.

G/TIPs priorities are outlined below in descending order of importance.

Prosecution

The top priority of G/TIP is to work with foreign governments to develop comprehensive legislation, strengthen anti-trafficking laws and enforcement strategies, and train criminal justice officials on those laws and practices and how to implement them-in turn, leading to increased numbers of arrests, prosecutions, convictions and prison sentences for traffickers and complicit government officials, including military personnel. The TIP Report indicates that progress on law enforcement response to trafficking in persons has stalled in some regions. This is occurring, in part, due to corrupt and complicit officials, judges, and police, and thus G/TIP must address this barrier to functioning rule of law and democracy. G/TIP's foreign assistance strategy prioritizes funding for programs in eligible Tier 3, Tier 2 Watch List, and Tier 2 countries ranked in the TIP Report and funding for technical assistance programs that provide training for law enforcement, guidance on drafting and implementing anti-trafficking laws, and promote coordination between the criminal justice system and nongovernmental organizations that assist victims of trafficking. G/TIP staff will visit priority countries to identify promising practices and country specific anti-trafficking strategies will be developed in collaboration with posts, missions, nongovernmental organizations, law enforcement agencies and criminal justice organizations.

Protection

G/TIP follows the apt premise of the TVPA, which calls for a victim-centered approach-so that victims are not treated as criminals or illegal aliens to detain or deport, but vulnerable people to be protected. Trafficking victims suffer physical and mental abuse; when rescued they need protection from their traffickers, a safe place to stay, medical care, counseling, legal advocacy, and assistance with reintegration into society. We use the three-R protocol of rescue, restore, and rehabilitation of victims to help them become survivors. For this reason, our second priority is to increase capacity of civil society organizations to rescue and protect victims of human trafficking by funding programs in priority countries and by encouraging cooperation and dynamic relationships between foreign governments and nongovernmental organizations through our diplomatic engagement. Through outreach, we seek to involve a greater number of foreign and civil society organizations that support USG policies and goals on trafficking in persons and we work to expand the diversity of donors contributing to victim assistance projects, including foreign governments and private sector actors.

Prevention

Our third goal is to develop and implement strategies to prevent sex trafficking, child sex tourism, and all forms of labor servitude. We do this by increasing public awareness through the use of electronic media outlets and print media. We solicit proposals for country projects that promote collaboration between NGOs, criminal justice organizations, and foreign governments to develop public awareness and education campaigns that warn those most vulnerable of the dangers of trafficking. We also engage of the private sector to promote public-private partnerships to reduce demand. We push international organizations and troop contributing countries through diplomatic engagement and foreign assistance as well as our own Department of Defense to aggressively enforce policies to prevent military and civilian personnel from engaging in human trafficking or sexual exploitation during peacekeeping and humanitarian missions. Finally, we include provisions addressing the demand that fuels TIP in international resolutions, conventions and protocols focused on trafficking in persons.

An important task under this goal is continued emphasis on combating trafficking for labor exploitation. Over the last two years, G/TIP has placed special importance on trafficking for labor exploitation, particularly involuntary servitude of foreign laborers (which has been documented widely in the Muslim world). Labor trafficking may involve foreign guest workers who end up in conditions of involuntary servitude, or domestic servants in private homes, or victims trafficked within their own country. This will continue to be a priority for the office in FY 2008 and FY 2009. The US Government's sustained efforts to curb trafficking for commercial sexual exploitation has produced progress, but many foreign governments lack even the most basic tools with which to address trafficking for labor exploitation. Congress recognized this gap and consequently emphasized the need to address forced labor and other forms of coerced labor exploitation in the December 2005 Trafficking Victims' Protection Reauthorization Act.

Interagency Coordination

The Trafficking Victims Protection Act provides the mandate for President's Interagency Task Force (PITF), a cabinet level body chaired by the Secretary of State. Leading USG agencies responsible for anti-trafficking programs and policies authorized by the TVPA are represented on the PITF. G/TIP provides staff support for the Task Force in several ways, including measuring and evaluating progress of the US and other countries in the areas of prosecution and enforcement against traffickers, protection of and assistance to victims, and trafficking prevention; expanding interagency procedures to collect and organize data; facilitating a review by agencies of each others grant proposals for complementarity and engaging in consultation and advocacy with governmental and nongovernmental organizations.

As Ambassador-at-large and Director of G/TIP, I chair the Senior Policy Operating Group (SPOG) on human trafficking, which is the senior management group of the President's Interagency Task Force on Trafficking. To elicit cooperation from other nations, they need to see that we recognize the USG has the same problem with TIP here at home. Thousands are trafficked into the United States annually. I plan to work with domestic agencies and public-private partnerships to show other nations we are not just hectoring them to change but deeply committed to change ourselves. Among other things, we need to expand prosecutions, increase identification of foreign national and US citizen victims, and address the demand that is an inexorable magnet for sex trafficking by educating "customers" they are enablers of violent exploiters.

Management

To meet its statutory responsibilities, G/TIP will continue to recruit, train, and support qualified and versatile employees and provide them with opportunities to obtain the skills, abilities, and training required to meet management and program needs. We will also reach out to other parts of the Department to provide expertise, information and training to employees, including Foreign Service Officers, outgoing Ambassadors, other Embassy officers, and civilian police.

Foreign Assistance Resources

G/TIP has been working closely with the Office of the Director of Foreign Assistance to align foreign assistance for trafficking in persons with the policies, findings, and recommendations of the TIP Report. G/TIP receives foreign assistance funding from two sources: Economic Support Funds (ESF) and International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement (INCLE). For FY 2009, G/TIP requests $40 million to combat trafficking in persons.

Centrally Managed Programs: $15 million ($6.5 million INCLE and $8.5 million ESF)

Centrally managed programs to combat trafficking in persons will be directed to: a) projects in Tier 3 countries and Tier 2 Watch List countries with the economic need and political will to address the problem; b) projects in Tier 2 countries that target law enforcement or victim protection deficiencies that jeopardize their Tier 2 ranking; c) pilot projects that are replicable and show promise; d) emergency anti-trafficking efforts in response to unforeseen circumstances (e.g., conflict or natural disaster); and e) research and evaluation.

In FY 2007, G/TIP will award approximately $11 million in centrally managed ESF and INCLE funds, which is a reduction from $16 million in FY 2006. Base funding is going down even as a multi-year special Presidential Initiative on TIP of $50 million has also elapsed, all at a time when we have a clearer sense of places to direct funding based on our enhanced travels abroad, comprehensive programmatic reviews, and the strengthened and more detailed TIP Report. An example of the need for increased funding can be seen from the response received from posts to the FY 2007 solicitation for program proposals. G/TIP received 293 proposals requesting a total of $81 million for anti-trafficking projects: 250 from embassies from 91 countries and 43 from NGOs proposing global and regional projects.

We are requesting $6.5 million in INCLE funds to provide assistance with rule of law activities which is our first priority and the majority of grant proposals received by G/TIP are for this purpose. Many of the countries ranked in the lowest tiers of the TIP Report require assistance with rule of law efforts. G/TIP's FY 2008 INCLE funds were restricted to $5 million.

We are requesting $8.5 in ESF for FY 2009 since there has been a decrease in INCLE funding for G/TIP in Fy2007 and FY 2008, more ESF funds are needed to offset the decrease. This increase is needed to address the gap between the increased number of excellent applications requiring funds and available program funding. Requests to provide victim assistance are particularly high. In FY 2009 we will implement the same strategy as in FY 2008 whereby we will use the 2008 TIP Report as a blueprint and funds will be directed to the priority countries where trafficking is on the rise, there is a demonstrable need for resources and there is political will to address the deficiencies. Tier 2 Watch List countries will also receive priority. Proposed activities will be closely coordinated with other on-going USG programs to ensure consistency and to avoid anti-human trafficking program duplication. All funded projects will be vetted through the SPOG review procedures to ensure compliance with USG policy.

Country Programs: $25 million ESF

Based on the findings and recommendations of the 2007 TIP Report, G/TIP has recommended bi-lateral support for efforts during FY 2008 and FY 2009 that target the following 43 countries (in order of priority): 1) India, 2) Cambodia, 3) South Africa, 4) Kenya, 5) Egypt, 6) Dominican Republic, 7) Philippines, 8) Thailand, 9) Bangladesh, 10) Mexico, 11) Sri Lanka, 12) Ukraine, 13) Guatemala, 14) Bolivia, 15) Chad, 16) Burundi, 17) Djibouti, 18) Ethiopia, 19) Sudan, 20) Guinea-Bissau, 21) Honduras, 22) Paraguay, 24) Mauritania, 25) Mozambique, 26) Azerbaijan, 27) Afghanistan, 28) Pakistan, 29) Kazakhstan, 30) Nepal, 31) Yemen, 32) Libya, 33) Mongolia, 34) Russia, 35) Armenia, 36) Moldova, 37) CAR, 38) Mali, 39) Zambia, 40) Kyrgyz Republic, 41) Papua New Guinea, 42) Fiji, Kiribati, and 43) Solomon Islands. G/TIP staff will work vigorously and collaboratively with staff at posts and missions to design programs that build on existing efforts and address prosecution, protection, and prevention activities.

State Operations Resources

The work of G/TIP has increased significantly in past years and it continues to grow as a result of the following: 1) an ambitious set of anti-trafficking activities assigned to G/TIP by law that are, therefore, nondiscretionary; 2) the rising number of countries assessed in the TIP Report each year; 3) the alignment of foreign assistance with the findings and recommendations of the TIP Report requires strategic planning with the Office of the Director of Foreign Assistance and other bureaus; 4) new and ongoing international programs must be monitored and evaluated, 5) public diplomacy and outreach creates enhanced requests for information and new dynamic materials, and 6) increased interagency coordination and information sharing.

G/TIP currently has 25 FTE's, one part-time employee, and one loaned position that is filled by a detailee from the Department of Justice. The office employs 4 contractors, as well as interns, to expand its workload capacity.

I am requesting three new FTEs to meet the increased workload cited above and to reduce the number of contractors that will save D&CP operating funds. I need to add one more Foreign Service Officer (FSO) to the reports staff; another FTE for the programs staff; and another FTE for strategic planning and budgeting. The additional FSO position is needed on the reports staff to assess steadily increasing number of countries assessed for the TIP Report through engaging regional bureaus and foreign governments using foreign policy and field experience. It was recommended by the Inspector General in the routine 2005 inspection report that G/TIP add more FSOs (as this office suffers from an imbalance with only one FS FTE at present). A new international programs officer will augment the capacity of the programs team to perform enhanced monitoring and evaluation of new and existing country projects. A strategic planner for budget is an essential need to assist aligning the annual TIP Report with the Foreign Assistance and State Operations budgets. That role is currently filled by the senior DOJ detailee who returns to her post in October 2007.

I project that G/TIP will need $1.619 million in Diplomatic and Consular Programs (D&CP) operational funds in FY 09. This is an increase of $300,000 over the FY 08 request.This will allow our growing staff to travel to more countries in order to make effective assessments of foreign governments and to more effectively monitor and evaluate on-going USG-funded programs and contractors.

The total funding requested by G/TIP is $16.619 million, including $1.619 million in D&CP funds, $6.5million in INCLE funds and $8.5 million in ESF. The USG has succeeded in significantly increasing global recognition that slavery is thriving in the 21st century. Recognition must be supported by aggressive global law enforcement, compassionate victim services, and creative prevention activities around the world. The funding requested by G/TIP will allow the USG to fulfill Congressional mandates and implement these critical, timely elements of the President's anti-slavery commitment.

In summary, 2007 is the 200th anniversary of the abolition of the British transatlantic slave trade. The movement led by parliamentarian William Wilberforce took decades to succeed. It required a nation to deepen its sense of how human dignity must be preserved. The same is required today of every nation taking up the contemporary challenge to eliminate human trafficking, a form of modern-day slavery.

State Operations Overview

Mission: The Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (GTIP) was established in October 2001 pursuant to the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000. G/TIP is the lead government advocate in the world on the issue of trafficking in persons and its mission is to nurture a movement of states, international organizations, and civil society actors to eradicate (rather than just regulate or mitigate) a modern-day form of slavery by prosecuting traffickers, protecting victims and preventing trafficking in persons.

Priorities: This office is responsible for centrally managing anti-trafficking funds; compiling the largest government-produced annual report on human trafficking; advancing public awareness and advocacy in concert with non-government organizations (NGOs), international organizations, Congress, and the media; and coordinating and chairing an interagency process guiding USG anti-trafficking policy and programs. These priorities all focus on the three-P paradigm of prosecution of traffickers, protection of victims, and prevention of trafficking in persons.

The Annual Trafficking in Persons Report:

G/TIP prepares a congressionally mandated report to Congress each year on foreign governments' efforts to eliminate severe forms of trafficking in persons. The seventh annual Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report was released June 12, 2007 and covers 164 countries, 151 of which are ranked. To prepare the Report G/TIP staff engages with foreign governments and civil society organizations to focus attention on trafficking in persons and conduct assessments of each country's anti-trafficking efforts according to the minimal criteria established in the TVPA. Countries included in the report are placed in one of four categories (Tier 1, Tier 2, Tier 2 Watch List, and Tier 3) based on the degree to which they comply with the minimum standards of the TVPA. Over the years, the report has become a powerful, effective tool to spur foreign governments to take action against TIP. Its high credibility is based on tough, honest and objective assessments of efforts made by foreign governments to address and eradicate TIP. The goal of this report is not to punish, but to stimulate government action to end modern-day slavery. In every case, as for all Tier 3 and Tier 2 Watch list countries, the USG outlines a mini-action plan through which to spur bilateral commitment, together, on behalf of victims.

Centrally Managed International Programs:

G/TIP currently manages 127 open grants, with an additional 80 expected to be awarded before the end of FY 2007. This totals over $40 million in grant funds that the office oversees to combat TIP throughout the world. G/TIP staff prepare solicitations, organize panel reviews of grant proposals, monitor ongoing projects, make site visits to the field, and identify technical assistance and research needs. In FY 2007, G/TIP will award approximately $11 million in centrally managed ESF and INCLE funds. For FY 2009 G/TIP will use the 2008 TIP Report as a blueprint and will focus funds on identified priority countries where trafficking is on the rise, where there is a demonstrable need for resources and where there is political will to address the problems and deficiencies. Proposals will be solicited from Embassies, international organizations and nongovernmental organizations for projects that support overseas education and training programs for law enforcement officers, prosecutors, and the judiciary; efforts to assist, protect, and rescue victims around the world; and, support public education programs that raise global awareness about human trafficking and how it can be abolished. Proposed activities will continue to be coordinated with other on-going USG programs (through the interagency Senior Policy Operating Group, SPOG, chaired by G/TIP's Director) to ensure consistency and to avoid anti-human trafficking program duplication. All funded projects will be vetted through the SPOG review procedures to ensure compliance with USG policy.

Public Outreach:

G/TIP is engaged in international coverage and widespread dissemination of trafficking information through popular media outlets including print news articles, wire stories, TV and radio segments, Internet publications, and digital video conferences - reaching an estimated 500 million people each year. G/TIP develops partnerships with faith-based groups, private citizens who can provide resources and other assistance in the fight to eliminate human trafficking, using diplomatic and foreign policy assets to encourage other nations, the United Nations (UN), and other multilateral institutions to work together. Outreach to the business community for public-private partnerships focuses on developing strategies to prevent sex trafficking, child sex tourism, child labor and other forms of servitude. To date over 600 travel and tourism companies in 28 countries have made a commitment to combat child sex tourism by signing the Global Code of Conduct for the Protection of Children from Sexual Exploitation in Travel and Tourism.

Interagency Coordination:

G/TIP coordinates with other USG agencies to ensure that interagency anti-trafficking policy, grant, and planning issues are consistent with legislative mandates and Presidential directive. The Cabinet-level President's Interagency Task Force is chaired by the Secretary of State and staffed by G/TIP. The Senior Policy Operating Group (SPOG) which is the senior level management body chaired by the Director of G/TIP and staffed by G/TIP, continues to meet quarterly and focus on priorities established by the Task Force and other emerging issues. Ongoing efforts include review of all anti-trafficking program proposals by SPOG agencies, the implementation of a unified policy document on combating HIV/AIDS and human trafficking; examination of measures to end demand for commercial sex acts; and promulgation of a regulation permitting T-Visa holders, when appropriate, to be granted Permanent Legal Resident status.

Goal Papers

Goal #1: Prosecution

Goal Description: One of the office's top priorities is to work with foreign governments to develop comprehensive anti-trafficking legislation, strengthen existing anti-trafficking laws and enforcement strategies, and train criminal justice officials on those laws and how to implement them. These steps, in turn, must lead to increased numbers of arrests, prosecutions, convictions and prison sentences commensurate with the seriousness of the crime for traffickers. This is all part of an effort to develop rule of law as a foundation to eradicate human trafficking, including addressing complicity of corrupt officials in trafficking. G/TIP's foreign assistance strategy prioritizes funding for anti-trafficking programs in eligible Tier 3, Tier 2 Watch List, and Tier 2 countries ranked in the Annual Trafficking in Persons Report, giving consideration to political will to address the problem and resource needs. Through diplomatic engagement and support for rule of law programs, we strive to create long term change. G/TIP staff visit priority countries to identify best practices and develop country specific anti-trafficking strategies in collaboration with posts, missions law enforcement agencies, criminal justice organizations, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). We also support technical assistance and training for law enforcement officers, prosecutors and judges and programs that promote coordination between the criminal justice system and nongovernmental organizations that assist victims of trafficking.

Department Goal Linkage: Achieving Peace and Security; Governing Justly and Democratically

USG Partners: DHS; DOJ; USAID

Performance Indicator #1: Link programs centrally managed by G/TIP to priority countries identified in the annual TIP Report leading to new or existing anti-trafficking laws and increased arrests, prosecutions, convictions and sentences for traffickers.
FY 2006 Target: [This section intentionally left blank; not a part of the FY06 BSP]

FY 2006 Result:

FY 2007 Target: G/TIP funds at least twenty new rule of law or technical assistance programs in Tier 3 or Tier 2 Watch List priority countries with economic need and the political will to address the problem. Staff conduct site visits to at least 50% of priority countries.(Tier 3, Tier 2 Watch List, and Tier 2 countries with resource needs and the political will to address the problem).

FY 2008 Target: G/TIP continues funding 15 rule of law or technical assistance programs and initiates ten new programs in Tier 3 or Tier 2 Watch List or Tier 2 priority countries with economic need and the political will to address the problem. Staff conducts site visits to at least 60% of priority countries (Tier 3, Tier 2 Watch List, and Tier 2 countries with resource needs and the political will to address the problem).

FY 2009 Target: G/TIP continues funding at least forty new rule of law or technical assistance programs and initiates 20 new programs in Tier 3 or Tier 2 Watch List or Tier 2 priority countries with economic need and the political will to address the problem. Staff conducts site visits to at least 70% of priority countries.

Goal #2: Protection

Goal Description: Our second priority is to increase capacity of governments and civil society partners to rescue and protect victims of human trafficking by funding programs in priority countries and encouraging cooperation and dynamic relationships between foreign governments and NGOs through diplomatic engagement. We seek to involve a greater number of US and foreign civil society organizations that support USG policies and goals on trafficking in persons. G/TIP's foreign assistance strategy prioritizes funding for programs in eligible Tier 3, Tier 2 Watch List, and Tier 2 countries ranked in the annual Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report, giving consideration to political will and resource needs.

Department Goal Linkage: Governing Justly and Democratically; Investing in People

USG Partners: DOJ; DOL; USAID

Performance Indicator #1: Civil society organizations and foreign governments provide increased protection services to victims.

FY 2006 Target: [This section intentionally left blank; not a part of the FY06 BSP]

FY 2006 Result:

FY 2007 Target: G/TIP funds at least ten new programs in priority countries to promote cooperative efforts between governments and civil society organizations leading to the development of policies and procedures for the rescue, protection and rehabilitation of victims. These include grants to nongovernmental organizations working in partnership with law enforcement to identify and protect victims through the creation of hotlines and/or shelters and model programs for victim rehabilitation and reintegration, including the provision of employment opportunities. G/TIP supports a technical assistance program to improve the quality of care for trafficking victims in ten priority countries.

FY 2008 Target: G/TIP continues funding at least ten programs and funds ten new programs in priority countries to promote cooperative efforts between governments and civil society organizations leading to the development of policies and procedures for the rescue, protection and education of victims. These include grants to nongovernmental organizations working in partnership with law enforcement to identify and protect victims through the creation of hotlines or shelters and model programs for victim rehabilitation and reintegration, including the provision of employment opportunities. G/TIP supports a technical assistance program to improve the quality of care for trafficking victims in 15 priority countries and disseminates information on best practices for minimum standards of care for victims.

FY 2009 Target: G/TIP continues funding 10 programs and funds 10 new programs in priority countries to promote cooperative efforts between governments and civil society organizations leading to the development of policies and procedures for the rescue, protection and education of victims. These include grants to nongovernmental organizations working in partnership with law enforcement to identify and protect victims through the creation of hotlines or shelters and model programs for victim rehabilitation and reintegration, including the provision of employment opportunities. G/TIP supports a technical assistance program to improve the quality of care for trafficking victims in 20 priority countries and develops and disseminates information on best practices for minimum standards of care for victims.

Goal #3: Prevention

Goal Description: Our third goal is to develop and implement strategies to prevent sex trafficking, child sex tourism, child labor and all forms of forced labor and servitude. We do this by increasing public awareness through the use of electronic media outlets, print media, publications and the Internet. We solicit proposals for country projects that promote collaboration between foreign governments, criminal justice organizations, and NGOs to develop public awareness and education campaigns warning those most vulnerable of the dangers of trafficking. We also pursue engagement with the private sector to promote public-private partnerships to reduce demand. Through cooperation with the Department of Defense, and our diplomatic engagement and foreign assistance, we push international organizations and troop contributing countries to aggressively enforce policies to prevent military and civilian personnel from engaging in trafficking, sexual exploitation abuse at in international peacekeeping and humanitarian missions. Finally, we include anti-demand provisions in international resolutions, conventions, and protocols focused on trafficking in persons.

Department Goal Linkage: Governing Justly and Democratically

USG Partners: ED; DHS; DOJ; DOL; USAID

Performance Indicator #1: Increased global media coverage of human trafficking.

FY 2006 Target: The number of global media impressions (the number of readers, viewers, or listeners of the media outlet of that day or time slot) mentioning the "Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons," the "U.S. Trafficking in Persons Report," or the "U.S. Department of State" and "human trafficking" in the same report increases by 5% and the use of the G/TIP website increases by 10%. Effective anti-trafficking policies are implemented by international organizations. G/TIP initiates 15 additional digital video conferences to build relationships with Embassy personnel, foreign government leaders, the news media, and NGOs. Outreach events with international visitors interested in trafficking in persons increases to 20.

FY 2006 Result:

FY 2007 Target: The number of global media impressions (the number of readers, viewers, or listeners of the media outlet of that day or time slot) mentioning the "Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons," the "U.S. Trafficking in Persons Report," or the "U.S. Department of State" and "human trafficking" in the same report increases by 5% and the use of the G/TIP website increases by 10%. Effective anti-trafficking policies are implemented by international organizations. G/TIP initiates 15 additional digital video conferences to build relationships with Embassy personnel, foreign government leaders, the news media, and NGOs. Outreach events with international visitors interested in trafficking in persons increases to 20.

FY 2008 Target: The number of global media impressions (the number of readers, viewers, or listeners of the media outlet of that day or time slot) mentioning the "Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons," the "U.S. Trafficking in Persons Report," or the "U.S. Department of State" and "human trafficking" in the same report increases by 10% and the use of the G/TIP website increases by 20%. Effective anti-trafficking policies are implemented by international organizations. G/TIP initiates 20 additional digital video conferences to build relationships with Embassy personnel, foreign government leaders, the news media, and nongovernmental organizations. Outreach events with international visitors interested in trafficking in persons increases to 25.

FY 2009 Target: The number of global media impressions (the number of readers, viewers, or listeners of the media outlet of that day or time slot) mentioning the "Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons," the "U.S. Trafficking in Persons Report," or the "U.S. Department of State" and "human trafficking" in the same report increases by 15% and the use of the G/TIP website increases by 30%. Effective anti-trafficking policies are implemented by international organizations such as the UN. G/TIP initiates 25 additional digital video conferences to build relationships with Embassy personnel, foreign government leaders, the news media, and nongovernmental organizations. Outreach events with international visitors interested in trafficking in persons increases to 30.

Goal #4: Interagency Coordination

Goal Description: The Trafficking Victims Protection Act mandates the President's Interagency Task Force (PITF), a cabinet level body chaired by the Secretary of State. Leading USG agencies responsible for anti-trafficking programs and policies authorized by the TVPA are represented on the PITF. G/TIP provides staff support for the Task Force in several ways, including measuring and evaluating progress of the US and other countries in the areas of trafficking prosecution and enforcement against traffickers, identification of victims and assistance to protect them, protection of victims, prevention through public awareness; developing interagency procedures to collect and organize coordinated data; and reviewing each others' proposed grant-making to ensure complementarity, nonduplication and consistency with USG policy premises. The Senior Policy Operating Group (SPOG), chaired by the Director of G/TIP, is responsible for implementing policies and programs authorized by the PITF and mandated by the TVPA.

Department Goal Linkage: Strengthening Consular and Management Capabilities; Achieving Peace and Security

USG Partners: DOD; ED; HHS; DHS; DOJ; DOL; USAID

Performance Indicator #1: Coordinate and implement coordinated USG anti-trafficking policies and programs.

FY 2006 Target: [This section intentionally left blank; not a part of the FY06 BSP]

FY 2006 Result:

FY 2007 Target: The SPOG reviews all USG anti-trafficking grants and contracts. At the end of the fiscal year, SPOG staff gathers and organizes data on USG funds obligated for TIP projects. The PITF meets annually. The SPOG meets quarterly. SPOG subcommittees meet at least twice a year. Posts receive guidance about how to ensure that actors working in HIV/AIDS programs supported with USG funds provide information on suspected TIP victims. G/TIP continues to collaborate with the DOT, the travel and tourism industry, including the airlines associations to elevate awareness and take tangible steps to combat child sex tourism.

FY 2008 Target: The SPOG reviews all USG anti-trafficking grants and contracts. At the end of the fiscal year, SPOG staff gathers and organizes data on USG funds obligated for TIP projects. The PITF meets annually. The SPOG meets quarterly. SPOG subcommittees meet at least twice a year. Posts receive guidance about how to ensure that actors working in HIV/AIDS programs supported with USG funds provide information on suspected TIP victims. G/TIP continues to collaborate with the private sector, including the travel and tourism industry and DOT to take tangible steps to fight child sex tourism. The SPOG reviews proposed measures to be applied in the US and encouraged by the USG in other countries to end demand for commercial sex acts.

FY 2009 Target: The SPOG reviews all USG anti-trafficking grants and contracts. At the end of the fiscal year, SPOG staff gathers and organizes data on USG funds obligated for TIP projects. The PITF meets annually. The SPOG meets quarterly. SPOG subcommittees meet at least twice a year. The SPOG issues policies and practices focused on ending demand for commercial sex acts to be applied in the US and encouraged by the USG in other countries.

Goal #5: Professional Development

Goal Description: To develop internal expertise, G/TIP will continue to support professional development for G/TIP employees through appropriate staffing, training opportunities, mentoring and leadership. We will recruit, train and support qualified and versatile employees and provide them with opportunities to obtain the skills and abilities required to meet management and program needs. We train our employees' capacity to in turn provide information, education and training on trafficking in persons to employees in other parts of the Department, including Foreign Service Officers and Ambassadors before their assignments begin. We do the same for other USG agencies and we educate international program participants, train civilian police and others to explain US anti-trafficking law, the Trafficking in Persons Report, pertinent international conventions and protocols in order to encourage activism in monitoring and combating trafficking in persons through diplomacy and international programs.

Department Goal Linkage: Strengthening Consular and Management Capabilities

USG Partners:

Performance Indicator #1: G/TIP staff have the training, skills, and professional tools to more efficiently and effectively perform their job functions.

FY 2006 Target: [This section intentionally left blank; not a part of the FY06 BSP]

FY 2006 Result:

FY 2007 Target: 25% of staff attends two professional development courses in the course of the year. 20% of staff are proficient in a second language.

FY 2008 Target: 30% of staff attends two professional development courses. 25% of staff are proficient in a second language.

FY 2009 Target: 40% of staff attends two professional development courses. 30% of staff are proficient in a second language.

Performance Indicator #2: G/TIP staff educate and train other USG employees and international visitors on trafficking in persons.

FY 2006 Target: [This section intentionally left blank; not a part of the FY06 BSP]

FY 2006 Result:

FY 2007 Target: 15% of staff conduct two training opportunities for other USG personnel and other countries' officials on prosecution of traffickers, protection of victims, and prevention of trafficking in persons.

FY 2008 Target: 20% of staff conduct two training opportunities for other USG personnel and other countries' officials on prosecution of traffickers, protection of victims, and prevention of trafficking in persons.

FY 2009 Target: 25% of staff conduct two training opportunities for other USG personnel and other countries' officials on prosecution of traffickers, protection of victims, and prevention of trafficking in persons.

FY 2009 State Operations Summary
Funding ($ in thousands)

FY 2007

Estimate

FY 2008

Request

FY 2009

Bureau Request

Increase/

(Decrease)

$ %

Diplomatic and Consular Programs (D&CP)

American Salaries

2,787

2,896

3,012

116

4

Operations

1,297

1,319

1,619

300

22.7

Total, D&CP

4,084

4,215

4,631

416

9.9

Appendix A - Acronyms
No Acronyms have been defined.


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