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 You are in: Under Secretary for Management > From the Under Secretary > Remarks

Dedication of the Embassy of the United States of America in Dar es Salaam

Grant S. Green, Jr., Under Secretary of State for Management
Remarks at the New Embassy Compound
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
March 4, 2003

I am proud to be here today to dedicate the new U.S. Embassy office building in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Tanzania is a close friend of the United States, and is a key coalition partner in the Global War on Terrorism. Moreover, the people of the United States deeply respect the resolute people of Tanzania, who have paid a terrible price in blood for their belief in tolerance, openness and religious freedom.

Dar es Salaam means "place of peace." However, on August 7, 1998 the forces of evil lead by Usama bin-Laden attempted to destroy that peace by bombing our Embassy building in a cowardly attack. They killed 11 Tanzanians, including eight embassy employees, and injured 72 Americans and Tanzanians. I have just met with, and heard the stories of, many of the survivors of that cowardly attack. They and their stories underscored for me two key facts. First, while the terrorists dealt us a grave blow that terrible day, they could not and did not destroy the spirit of friendship and cooperation that exists between the peoples of the Tanzania and the United States. Next, and just as importantly, the terrorists' cowardly attack could not and did not destroy the United States' resolve to maintain our presence here. Rebuilding our Embassy office building shows that the old saying about our flag is still true: "These colors do not run."

After the terrorist attack, we made a pledge to help relieve the suffering of the families of those killed in the bombing and the pain of the wounded. The United States contributed $1 million in short term disaster relief to pay for medical costs associated with the bombings, burials, physical therapy, and counseling and education trust funds for the orphans and children of the victims. We then developed a plan to help Tanzania's recovery and disaster management efforts. We dedicated $9.4 million to help improve disaster response capability and improve the quality and efficiencies of hospitals; to enhance disaster management; develop advanced trauma life support capabilities; and train disaster response teams.

We have continued our assistance to better the life of the average Tanzanian. Our assistance package totaled over $30 million last year. Of that amount, $23.8 million was used to combat the scourge of HIV/AIDS, and to increase quality and use of services for reproductive health and childcare. We used $3 million to build the capacity of local communities to participate in sustainable management of wildlife and protected areas and to share income derived from tourism. We donated $3.7 million to help micro and small enterprises, particularly those related to agriculture, produce needed goods and services, generate jobs, and increase income and opportunities for the poor.

There are currently 107 Peace Corps volunteers in Tanzania working in health, education and the environment. By the end of 2003 there will be 180 volunteers dedicated to helping the people of Tanzania.

From our new Embassy today, we rededicate ourselves to broadening and deepening our engagement with the 35 million citizens of Tanzania. We will use this wonderful facility, one of the highest-tech, most secure Embassies in the world, as a platform from which to strengthen even further the ties that bind the American and Tanzanian peoples together. But as we move forward in that effort, let us never forget the men and women, Tanzanian and American, who served proudly, bravely, and forthrightly, here and paid a price in blood for the ideals that both our nations hold dear. It is to them that we dedicate this building today.


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