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Bureau of African Affairs
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African Growth and Opportunity Act
 - 2008: African Growth and Opportunity Act
 - 2007: African Growth and Opportunity Act
 - 2006: African Growth and Opportunity Act
 - 2005: African Growth and Opportunity Act
 - 2004: African Growth and Opportunity Act
 - U.S. Policy on Africa
 - The AGOA Forums
 - Presidential Initiative: AGOA
 - African Growth and Opportunity Act (Department of Commerce)
  

African Growth and Opportunity Act

Young African girl holds and reads book in class as other students watch.The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) was signed into law on May 18, 2000 as Title 1 of The Trade and Development Act of 2000. The Act offers tangible incentives for African countries to continue their efforts to open their economies and build free markets.

 

 

African Growth and Opportunity Act Forum

Secretary Rice addresses the opening of the 2008 African Growth and Opportunity Act [AGOA] Forum. (July 15, 2008): "But one of the most important accomplishments, one that I’ve been proudest to work for, is what we’ve done with you, my African friends and my colleagues....President Bush and I are proud of the dramatic increases in support to Africa that we have achieved since 2001: quadrupling U.S. foreign assistance, billions of dollars of debt relief for Africa’s 27 poorest nations, launching the Millennium Challenge Account initiative, signing nearly $4.3 billion worth of MCC compacts with ten African nations, and forging historic partnerships to fight HIV/AIDS and malaria. Ultimately, though, we measure the success of our partnership with Africa not in dollars, but in the lives that we have sought to improve." Full Text | The 7th AGOA Trade and Economic Cooperation Forum, July 14-16 in Washington, D.C. 


Secretary Rice (July 18, 2007): "Together, we are also expanding our critical partnership through the African Growth and Opportunity Act to unleash the creativity and industry of the people of Africa. And this partnership is growing. ThisSecretary Rice addresses the opening plenary session of the African Growth and Opportunity Act [AGOA] Forum.        year, we are pleased to welcome Liberia into AGOA, and to welcome back Mauritania, which has now restored its commitment to democracy and the rule of law.

Our AGOA partnership continues to change and adapt to Africa's growing role in the global economy. At last year's Forum, one of the key issues that participants raised was the need to extend certain AGOA trade benefits that were set to expire, particularly in textiles and the apparel sector."  Full text

 

African women at an open air market look through layers of brightly colored printed fabrics.

 

Past AGOA Forums: 1st | 2nd | 3rd | 4th | 5th6th | AGOA Success Stories (PDF)

  
Highlights

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Child Labor: U.S. Policy And Action
(Oct. 31): Trade preference programs such as the African Growth and Opportunity Act, Caribbean Basin Initiative and the Generalized Systems of Preferences contain eligibility criteria that include whether a country is “taking steps” or is making progress towards establishing the protection of internationally-recognized worker rights, including child labor. Fact Sheet

U.S. - Africa Sister Cities Conference
PDPA Director Anyaso (July 23): "What does AGOA mean to you and your communities? AGOA offers an opportunity of importing at reduced cost hundreds of products from Africa – apparel, specialty foods, handicrafts, and cut flowers, to name a few. AGOA is not a cure all, but it is one tool among many to encourage two-way trade with Africa. I encourage you to learn more about it."  Full text

Seventh U.S.-Sub-Saharan Africa Trade and Economic Cooperation Forum
(July 10): The seventh U.S.-Sub-Saharan Africa Trade and Economic Cooperation Forum (“the African Growth and Opportunity Act [AGOA] Forum”) with the theme of "Mobilizing Private Investment for Trade and Growth" will take place in Washington, D.C., July 14 to 16, 2008.  Full text

Deputy Assistant Secretary for African Affairs Todd Moss at the Foreign Press Center on July 1, 2008.  State Department photo.7th AGOA Forum
DAS Moss (July 1): "The future of Sub-Saharan Africa continues to look brighter, as we're seeing a growing number of countries begin to reap the benefits of sound, economic policy changes, improved governance and new investments in key sectors undertaken over the last decade. With the continued growth of responsible and representative governments in Africa and the recovery from several lengthy conflicts on the continent, much of Africa now is poised to see much more robust economic growth and an improvement in living standards." Full text

U.S.-Africa Policy and Florida
(Mar. 18): The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) has brought increased trade flows and new industry to Africa. AGOA has helped jump-start the rise in bilateral trade. AGOA has become the cornerstone of our trade and investment policy in Africa. It was and is a great idea that has worked. Full text

Africa: An Emerging Strategic Partner
(Mar. 5): In addition to aid, US-Africa trade has expanded. The very successful African Growth and Opportunity Act began under President Clinton. Thirty-nine countries are now AGOA eligible and over 4,000 product lines are covered, accounting for 98% of African goods that enter the US. Full text

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