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 You are in: Under Secretary for Political Affairs > Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs > Releases > Remarks > 2005 East Asian and Pacific Affairs Remarks, Testimony, and Speeches

Fourth Round of Six-Party Talks: Morning Hotel Transit

Christopher R. Hill, Assistant Srecretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs
Beijing, China
July 29, 2005

QUESTION: Are you going to be talking to the North Koreans this morning?

A/S HILL: We’re going to have talks with a number of the delegations.

QUESTION: Are you going to be able to do the draft statement today?

A/S HILL: Well I think we are going to start looking at what some of these ideas look like on paper. And we will see how they look and might be today, might be tomorrow, might be the next day. We are here for the long haul and we are here until we make some progress, so lets see how we do today. You will be the first to know.

QUESTION: Are you going to stay next week?

A/S HILL: I don’t know how long we will be here. We will be here as long as it is useful to be here. So far it has been very useful to be here. But, I think when we start putting ideas down on paper that means we enter a new phase and we have to see how successful that is. So we will just keep at it as long as we feel that it is useful to keep at it. I have got plenty of patience, plenty of energy so we’ll be fine.

QUESTION: What will the focus be of the meetings with the North Koreans today?

A/S HILL: First of all, we will be talking to the Chinese. We will be talking to the South Koreans. We will be talking to the Japanese and probably a bilateral with the Russians as well. So, in addition to those we will have a bilateral with the North Koreans. And I think we will probably continue the discussions we had yesterday. And, the discussions we had yesterday involved our ideas for how to get to the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula and their ideas. I am not saying they were identical. We had some of their ideas which we did not feel were usable but we had some of their ideas that very much correspond to some of the ideas that we had. So, you know it is a negotiative process. I am giving kind of real time information about it because we are right in the middle of it, so we have to see how it goes. But I hope you can be as patient as we are being.



Released on August 3, 2005

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