U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
Other State Department Archive SitesU.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
Home Issues & Press Travel & Business Countries Youth & Education Careers About State Video
 You are in: Under Secretary for Political Affairs > Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs > Releases > Remarks > 2005 East Asian and Pacific Affairs Remarks, Testimony, and Speeches

Resumption of Fourth Round of Six-Party Talks: Morning Transit, China World Hotel

Christopher R. Hill, Assistant Secretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs
Beijing, China
September 18, 2005

A/S HILL: Good morning. I don’t really have much new today, except we’re going to stay another day. We’re getting out to Diaoyutai. We have a meeting of the heads of delegation, and we’re going to see if we can deal with these remaining differences that I mentioned to you last night – to see if we can deal with them today. So we’re going to stay another day. I’ve talked with Secretary Rice a couple of times. We’ve been in touch with all our capitals. Also, as you know from Secretary Rice’s schedule, she had the opportunity to talk with some of the other foreign ministers of the delegations that are participating. So we’ll see where we are at the end of the day.

QUESTION: Ambassador Hill, earlier in the week, you spoke about the importance of unanimity, and now it appears that Russia and China have clearly decided that the document is something that they can accept. How concerned are you that there appears to be less unanimity now than there was earlier?

A/S HILL: Well, actually, we’re all very supportive of the document. The issue is the tactics of how we express elements of the document. That is, we agree to what we are trying to do. The issue is how we express that in this document, and some delegations prefer to leave some things more ambiguous. My delegation would like to see things less ambiguous. We have to resolve some of the tactics of it, but I cannot accept the premise of your question that somehow we are not together on this because I feel we very much are. Last night I sat between the Russian and Chinese delegates. We had very good exchange on this. Thank you very much.



Released on September 19, 2005

  Back to top

U.S. Department of State
USA.govU.S. Department of StateUpdates  |   Frequent Questions  |   Contact Us  |   Email this Page  |   Subject Index  |   Search
The Office of Electronic Information, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department. External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.
About state.gov  |   Privacy Notice  |   FOIA  |   Copyright Information  |   Other U.S. Government Information

Published by the U.S. Department of State Website at http://www.state.gov maintained by the Bureau of Public Affairs.