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Morning Walkthrough in Singapore

Christopher R. Hill, Assistant Secretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs
St. Regis Hotel
Singapore
December 5, 2008

QUESTION: (inaudible)

ASSISTANT SECRETARY HILL: I think we’re meeting them at ten o’clock again at the U.S. Embassy. I don’t think we have a schedule for how long it will be.

QUESTION: Do you have any indication of how long it will be?

ASSISTANT SECRETARY HILL: I don’t think we do. We’re -- we just agreed we’d meet in the morning. And it could be very briefly; I just don’t know.

QUESTION: Do you have any plans for a working dinner tonight?

ASSISTANT SECRETARY HILL: No, I don’t.

QUESTION: On the schedule, like were (inaudible) the Singaporeans?

ASSISTANT SECRETARY HILL: No, unfortunately. I had another scheduled, but I -- my meeting was cancelled. So as soon as we’re done here, we might look into when we are leaving for Seoul.

QUESTION: Can you give us a sense - one brief question about the meeting with the Singaporeans yesterday - what was the (inaudible) and the energy assistance issue was discussed?

ASSISTANT SECRETARY HILL: Well, you know, we raised a lot of issues related to regional matters, including ASEAN and the U.S. bilateral relationship with Singapore. Our ambassador from - the U.S. ambassador to Singapore - also took part. And, you know, we talked about Burma and other things like that. So not so much -- I gave a little briefing on the North Korea situation and talked a little bit about transition in the U.S.

QUESTION: So you did not (inaudible) about the energy assistance?

ASSISTANT SECRETARY HILL: No, we talked -- no, we talked more generally about (inaudible) the six parties.

QUESTION: What was (inaudible)

ASSISTANT SECRETARY HILL: Oh, I think it’s the same topics as yesterday: fuel, disablement, and verification.

QUESTION: Are you trying to talk about the sampling issue?

ASSISTANT SECRETARY HILL: What issue?

QUESTION: Sampling issue.

ASSISTANT SECRETARY HILL: Sampling issue. What do you mean by that?

QUESTION: I mean the scientific verification.

ASSISTANT SECRETARY HILL: Oh, scientific procedures. I see. Yes, that issue did come up. Okay?

QUESTION: Do you think North Korea will come back (inaudible)?

ASSISTANT SECRETARY HILL: I’m sorry?

QUESTION: Do you think North Korea will come back (inaudible)?

ASSISTANT SECRETARY HILL: I don’t know. I know that -- you know, I explained to them what our view is. And it was very useful to have the trilateral meeting in Tokyo because I was able to convey the views that we have and, I think, views that are supported within the Six-Party process. So, I think they have a clear understanding of what we need in terms of how to go forward.

QUESTION: So the understanding that (inaudible) is still there (inaudible)?

ASSISTANT SECRETARY HILL: Oh, yeah. The issue is not the verification. The issue is how to express it in a piece of paper ahead of time, so there are no misunderstandings when the time comes.

QUESTION: And about this paper, you’re on the same page (inaudible)?

ASSISTANT SECRETARY HILL: We’ll see. I think so, we’ll see. Okay.


Released on December 5, 2008

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