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Newsletter: The INL Beat, January 2009

U.S. State Department
Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
Washington, DC


In This Issue:

 

INL Afghan Corrections Program Advances

Date: 12/01/2008 Description: CSSP Regional Advisor leads the INL delegation on a tour of the renovated prison in Jalalabad.  Photo by Grey Maggiano, INL
CSSP Regional Advisor leads the INL delegation on a tour of the renovated prison in Jalalabad. 
Date: 12/01/2008 Description: The new classroom in the Women's prison in Jalalabad, renovated by INL, with supplies recently delivered by the Mesa, Arizona Rotary Club. Photo by Grey Maggiano, INL
The new classroom in the Women’s prison in Jalalabad, renovated by INL, with supplies recently delivered by the Mesa, Arizona Rotary Club. 

[Photos by Grey Maggiano, INL, December 2008]

The INL Corrections System Support Program (CSSP) has substantially expanded its efforts over the previous year to improve prison administration, update facilities, and ensure that prisoners, particularly women, are treated with respect and dignity in Afghanistan.

By modernizing and reviewing the record keeping and administration of prisons in Afghanistan’s Pol-i-Charkhi prison and the Kabul Women’s Prison, the CSSP and the Justice Sector Support Program mentors have seen seventy prisoners released as their sentences have been completed.

CSSP has completed renovation projects at the prisons in Herat and Jalalabad that improves both security and living conditions. In Herat, CSSP has worked with the prison commander to renovate the kitchen, provide electricity to and replace the wiring in all of the cells, renovate the prison industries section, and rebuild the bakery. CSSP also worked with the prison commander and the Herat Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) to bring electricity to the facility.

The Jalalabad prison was hit by an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) early last year, and INL and the Nangarhar PRT have pitched in to repair the damage, reinforce external security, and renovate the interior of the prison. CSSP funds were used to renovate two of the three main wings of the prison and completely renovate the neighboring women’s facility. Members of the Mesa, Arizona Rotary Club visited Jalalabad and delivered school supplies, toys, blankets and sewing machines to the women and children living in Jalalabad prison. INL is grateful to the Rotary and to all organizations that have stepped up to provide assistance and support to women in Afghanistan.


Partnering with Iraq’s Judiciary

Date: 11/01/2008 Description: INL Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary William McGlynn, second from right, tours the JEDFI project the site with the Iraqi prime contractor and officers from the U.S. Corps of Engineers, which is overseeing the project.  Photo by Edgar C. Seeley
INL Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary William McGlynn, second from right, tours the JEDI project site with the Iraqi prime contractor and officers from the U.S. Corps of Engineers, which is overseeing the project. [Photo by Edgar C. Seeley, November 2008]

In partnership with the Government of Iraq, INL is assisting in the development of the Judicial Education and Development Institute (JEDI), a training facility in Baghdad for the continuing education of Iraq’s judges and other court specialists and administrators. While Iraq has a legal tradition stretching back thousands of years, the Iraqi judiciary suffered under the repressive regime of Saddam Hussein and has frequently faced violent threats from insurgents since 2003. JEDI will be a means for Iraq’s judicial personnel to hone their professional skills and update their knowledge in a safe environment, allowing them to contribute to the firm establishment of a democratic rule of law in their country. The continuing education and training program will encompass criminal investigation techniques, case management, judicial tradecraft, and court administration.

The JEDI project is taking shape on the grounds of the Central Criminal Court of Iraq just outside the International Zone in Baghdad. During a November visit, INL Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary William McGlynn toured the site with the Iraqi prime contractor and officers from the U.S. Corps of Engineers, which is overseeing the project. INL advisors are helping the Iraqi government develop the curricula, management, and organization of JEDI. Both foreign experts and Iraqi judges and professors will conduct courses and training sessions.

At a meeting in Baghdad, McGlynn met with Iraqi Chief Justice Medhat, who expressed his strong support for the new U.S.-Iraqi partnership at JEDI which will make significant contributions to the rule of law and constitutional order in Iraq. Justice Medhat expressed his hope that the Iraqi government would expand the JEDI model and extend it to the other regions of Iraq so that judges and court officers could get the professional training they needed in their own regions.
 

Demobilizing Armed Groups in Colombia

The INL-supported Colombian Ministry of Defense Demobilization Program (PAHD) has now drawn individuals from illegal armed groups, such as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and National Liberation Army (ELN), back into civilian life. INL’s role has been to support the PAHD by developing communications and programmatic guidance. Last year, 3,240 ex-combatants and militia surrendered to Colombian government representatives, an annual record for the program.

Colombia’s “carrot and stick” approach joins government’s security operations with a parallel public communications strategy that targets areas under military operations. The key has been to demonstrate that demobilized combatants can return to normal lives. Testimonial commercials of former FARC members are broadcast country-wide with this message. USAID then works with ex-combatants to provide job training and employment opportunities, mental health support, and access to education and healthcare services, which has proven critical to the successful reintegration of former members of illegal armed groups back into society.

The attached box tells the story:

Group
2002-2005
2006
2007
2008 (to 30 Nov)
Total
FARC
4,340
1,558
2,480
2,847
11,225
ELN
1,178
359
423
365
2,325
Former AUC
3,057
470
155
0
3,682
Other Groups
229
73
134
28
464
Total
8,804
2,460
3,192
3,240
17,696


(Note: The last permitted date for individual AUC demobilization was December 31st, 2006.)

Date: 11/01/2008 Description: Colombian Defense Minister Santos encourages demobilization at huge rally in former FARC stronghold. Colombian Vallenato stars Pipe Pelaez and Checo Acosta launch the demobilization inspired song at the rally and free concert.  Photo courtesy of Colombian Ministry of Defense
Colombian Defense Minister Santos encourages demobilization at huge rally in former FARC stronghold. Colombian Vallenato stars Pipe Pelaez and Checo Acosta launch the demobilization inspired song at the rally and free concert.

Date: 11/01/2008 Description: Communications Advisor interviews demobilized FARC 47th Front Commander. 1,237 FARC leaders have demobilized since 2002, including 427 in the first 11 months of 2008.  Photo courtesy of Colombian Ministry of DefenseCommunications Advisor interviews demobilized FARC 47th Front Commander. 1,237 FARC leaders have demobilized since 2002, including 427 in the first 11 months of 2008.

Date: 11/01/2008 Description: Vice Minister of Defense Sergio Jaramillo discusses 2009 demobilization strategy with Ambassador Brownfield. Photo courtesy of Colombian Ministry of Defense
Vice Minister of Defense Sergio Jaramillo discusses 2009 demobilization strategy with Ambassador Brownfield.

Date: 11/01/2008 Description: The emotional reunion of ex-FARC hostage with his demobilized captor, who he taught to read during his lengthy captivity.  Photo courtesy of Colombian Ministry of Defense
The emotional reunion of ex-FARC hostage with his demobilized captor, who he taught to read during his lengthy captivity.

[Photos courtesy of Colombian Ministry of Defense, November 2008]



INL Transport Airplane Arrives in Afghanistan

Date: 11/01/2008 Description: INL Air Wing Contract Flight Crew in Front of the DC-3TP in Kabul, Afghanistan.  Photo by Rogers Woolfolk
INL Air Wing Contract Flight Crew in Front of the DC-3TP in Kabul, Afghanistan. [Photo by Rogers Woolfolk, November 2008]

On November 17th, the latest addition to INL’s air fleet, a DC-3TP, arrived in Kabul, Afghanistan following a multi-leg transcontinental flight from Patrick Air Force Base, Florida. Our DC-3TP is a product of Basler Turbo Conversions, LLC of Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Basler begins the conversion with the basic airframe of an original DC-3, strips and reconditions it, lengthens it, and equips it with turbine engines, new wiring, and state-of-the-art avionics to enhance performance and maintainability.

The aircraft and crew will soon begin cargo and passenger transport and general support missions for programs throughout Afghanistan. The aircraft, which can carry 6,000 pounds of cargo or 30 passengers, has austere and short-field capabilities that make it possible to operate from many locations throughout the country. Additionally, the airplane’s high definition camera and digital video recording system will provide high resolution, geo-located images of poppy fields.

The DC-3TP joins ten INL helicopters and three other fixed-wing aircraft supporting police training, narcotics interdiction, and manual poppy eradication. The Office of Aviation (or “Air Wing”), headquartered at Patrick Air Force Base, Florida provides oversight of INL’s aviation activities.

The Air Wing operates from two facilities in Afghanistan -- Camp Alvarado and Camp Valdes. Camp Alvarado was named in honor of Mario Alvarado, an INL pilot killed in the shoot-down of an OV-10 “Bronco” airplane while in Colombia. Camp Valdes was named in honor of Julio Valdes, a Cuban ex-patriot, long-time U.S. citizen, who was the first pilot in the INL aviation program. Julio was lost at sea during bad weather in 2001 while ferrying a T-65 Ayres aircraft from Colombia to the U.S.

Fighting Corruption in Indonesia

Date: 10/01/2008 Description: Linda Samuel, Deputy Chief of DOJs Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Section, and Ted Greenberg of the World Bank, discuss means of successfully recovering assets from overseas in connection with the UN Convention Against Corruption and the World Banks Stolen Asset Recovery [STAR] initiative.  Photo by INL Staff
Linda Samuel, Deputy Chief of DOJ's Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Section, and Ted Greenberg of the World Bank, discuss means of successfully recovering assets from overseas in connection with the UN Convention Against Corruption and the World Bank's Stolen Asset Recovery (STAR) initiative. [Photo by INL Staff, October 2008]

INL is helping Indonesia tackle its top crime priority -- corruption. On June 9, 2008, U.S. Attorney General Michael Mukasey and Indonesian Attorney General Hendarman Supandji signed an agreement providing $750,000 in INL funding to support the establishment of an Anti-Corruption Task Force to investigate and prosecute high-level corruption cases. Less than six months old, the fifty-prosecutor unit has already initiated more than 20 cases, including this November’s arrest of three former and current Director Generals at the Ministry of Law who caused losses to the Indonesian State of approximately $40 million dollars.

As part of INL’s support for the new Task Force, the Justice Department’s Resident Legal Advisor brought 12 members of the Task Force to the U.S. in October. Over the course of two weeks, the group met with judges, federal prosecutors, and court personnel from the Eastern District of California and the Southern and Eastern Districts of New York, Justice Department prosecutors and State Department officials in Washington, and state prosecutors in California. The delegation observed live courtroom proceedings, including trial, arraignment, guilty plea, and sentencing proceedings. As Indonesian prosecutors are also responsible for investigation, the group met with FBI corruption investigators in Sacramento and New York, as well as California investigators, auditors, and election oversight officials.

Among the benefits of the trip, the delegation learned more about different options for using recorded conversations as evidence in corruption cases and discussed various procedural options, such as plea bargaining, that are not currently available in Indonesia but are being considered in a new draft Criminal Procedure Code. The delegation also gained valuable insights on issues related to public disclosure of wealth.

The visit left the participants with concrete ideas to further improve the efficiency and accountability of the Anti-Corruption Task Force and reinforced the close cooperation between the U.S. and the Indonesian Attorney General’s office.

Reaching Out to the Law Enforcement Community

INL Deputy Assistant Secretary (DAS) Christy McCampbell led a group of INL officers participating in the 115th Annual International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) Conference in San Diego, California on November 8-12. The IACP is a professional association for executive-level officers in domestic and international policing. The annual meeting is the largest law enforcement conference in the world, with over 15,000 participants. DAS McCampbell serves as Chair of the IACP’s Organized Crime Committee and is a long-term member of the IACP Dangerous Drug Committee.

Along with several other State Department bureaus, federal agencies and vendors, INL also hosted a booth on the exhibit floor to explain the Bureau’s functions and roles as the U.S. Government entity responsible for organizing and funding international civilian police operations. The booth also informed the law enforcement community about how it could participate in U.S. Government-led international police and rule of law missions throughout the world. The response was excellent. INL will continue its ongoing public awareness campaign to describe its role as a leader in the international anti-narcotics and law enforcement community. INL has already reserved exhibit hall floor space at the 2009 IACP Conference in Denver in October.

Date: 11/01/2008 Description: Officers from the Office of Civilian Police and Rule of Law Programs [INL/CIV], Office of Afghanistan and Pakistan [INL/AP], and Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization [S/CRS] explain INL Programs and distribute communications materials to exhibit hall attendees.  Photo by Jeremy Clark, INL/CIV
Officers from the Office of Civilian Police and Rule of Law Programs (INL/CIV), Office of Afghanistan and Pakistan (INL/AP), and Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization (S/CRS) explain INL Programs and distribute communications materials to exhibit hall attendees. [Photo by Jeremy Clark, INL/CIV, November 2008]
Date: 11/01/2008 Description: Officers from the Office of Civilian Police and Rule of Law Programs [INL/CIV], Office of Afghanistan and Pakistan [INL/AP], Office of Anticrime Programs [INL/C], and Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization [S/CRS] at the 2008 IACP Conference.  Photo by Walter Redman, INL/CIV
Officers from the Office of Civilian Police and Rule of Law Programs (INL/CIV), Office of Afghanistan and Pakistan (INL/AP), Office of Anticrime Programs (INL/C), and Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization (S/CRS) at the 2008 IACP Conference. [Photo by Walter Redman, INL/CIV, November 2008]


Program Focus: INL Anti-Crime Teams Combat Transnational Crime and Illicit Threats

Date: 12/01/2008 Description: Banner: Second Session of the Conference of the States Parties to the United Nations Convention Against Corruption. State Dept Photo
The starting point of
U.S. diplomatic efforts is working collaboratively with other countries to promote the adoption of shared standards against corruption. Banner: Second Session of the Conference of the States Parties to the United Nations Convention Against Corruption.

Transnational crime and illicit networks pose significant threats to domestic and international security. INL anti-crime programs assist other governments to combat these growing threats by helping fight international organized criminal networks and gangs, high-level corruption (kleptocracy), money-laundering, terrorist financing, cyber- and intellectual property crimes, border security, narcotics trafficking and various other smuggling and trafficking crimes. INL’s Anti-Crime initiatives also help to deter, disrupt, defeat, and dismantle crime and corruption worldwide.

Transnational criminal networks today are: (1) increasingly global in reach, (2) involved in multiple forms of criminal activity, (3) expanding their criminal markets to include large-scale financial fraud and cyber-crime, (4) willing to protect their illicit activities through violent and ruthless means, (5) sometimes linked to international terrorist groups; and (6) devising novel organizational strategies to deter capture.

INL actively participates in multinational forums and partnerships working cooperatively to combat these threats and dismantle global criminal networks and kleptocratic regimes.

INL Anti-crime Teams:

  • Anti-corruption: Lead U.S. Government efforts to encourage other governments to implement the UN Convention Against Corruption and Regional Anticorruption Frameworks, and administer Presidential Proclamation 7750, which denies safe haven to kleptocrats.

  • Anti-Money Laundering/Counter-Terrorist Financing: Provide expert technical assistance to support Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and FATF-style Regional Bodies, and co-chairs the U.S. Government Terrorist Financing Working Group (TFWG).

  • Cybercrime/Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Enforcement: Help coordinate criminal enforcement training and technical assistance programs in intellectual property rights and high-tech crime.

  • Border Security: Work with our U.S. interagency and international partners to combat cross-border crimes, including to interdict and halt alien smuggling.


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