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Volume E-13
Documents 50-99
  

Documents 50-99

--  50. Message From the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger) to the President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs (Haig), Beijing, October 24, 1971 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

After calling the situation with Secretary of State Rogers "intolerable," Kissinger agreed to a stop over in Anchorage, Alaska, using the pretense of airplane repairs. He noted that the Chinese had agreed to the proposed dates for President Nixon's trip and that Chinese Premier Chou En-lai suggested the possibility of "coordinated action" between China and the U.S. in Pakistan.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 1035, Files for the President-China Material, China-HAK October 1971 Visit. Secret; Sensitive. A stamped notation indicates that it was received in the White House at 12:33 a.m. on October 24.


--  51. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, October 24, 1971, 10:28 a.m.-1:55 p.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

After a brief mention of troop withdrawals from Vietnam, President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger and Chinese Premier Chou En-lai discussed the joint communiqué, various historical world revolutions, the status of Taiwan, and the Indo-Pakistan conflict.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 1035, Files for the President-China Material, HAK visit to PRC, October 1971, Memcons-originals. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum; presumably drafted by Lord. All brackets are in the source text. The meeting was held in the Government Guest House. Attached at Tab A but not published is the draft communiqué.


--  52. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, October 24, 1971, 9:23-11:20 p.m.  [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger and Chinese Premier Chou En-lai again focused their discussions on the joint communiqué and the announcement of President Nixon's visit. Kissinger explained that domestic constraints prevented him from agreeing to any language critical of specific U.S. foreign policies, especially in regards to Taiwan and the war in Indochina.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 1035, Files for the President-China Material, HAK visit to PRC, October 1971, Memcons-originals. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum; presumably drafted by Lord. All brackets and ellipses are in the source text. The meeting was held in the Great Hall of the People. Attached at Tab A is the first Chinese draft. See Document 56 for text of the draft.


--  53. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, October 25, 1971, 10:21-11:00 a.m.  [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

This brief memorandum illustrates the difficulties inherent in drafting a communiqué.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 1035, Files for the President-China Material, HAK visit to PRC, October 1971, Memcons-originals. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum; presumably drafted by Lord. The meeting was held at the Government Guest House. Attached at Tab A is the second U.S draft of the communiqué. See Document 56 for text of the second draft, as well as the Chinese versions.


--  54. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, October 25, 1971, 9:50-11:40 p.m.  [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger rejected the inclusion by the Chinese of the words "world revolution" in the joint communiqué. Chinese Premier Chou En-lai, in turn, insisted upon an official commitment to reduce U.S. troops in Taiwan and restrain Japanese rearmament.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 1035, Files for the President-China Material, HAK visit to PRC, October 1971, Memcons-originals. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum; presumably drafted by Lord. All brackets and ellipses are in the source text. The meeting was held at the Government Guest House. Attached at Tab A is the second Chinese draft of the communiqué; attached at Tab B is the third U.S. draft of the communiqué. See Document 56 for text of these drafts.


--  55. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, October 26, 1971, 5:30-8:10 p.m.  [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

During the final meeting between Chinese and American officials, President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger cautioned that he was out in front of official U.S. policy on Taiwan and could not guarantee that President Nixon would agree to the entire formulation. He agreed that the U.S. would not challenge the reality of one China and that Taiwan was a province of China. Chinese Premier Chou En-lai maintained that where there were fundamental differences, especially in the interpretation of words such as "peaceful competition" and "individual freedom," the differences should remain in the communiqué.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 1035, Files for the President-China Material, HAK visit to PRC, October 1971, Memcons-originals. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum. The meeting was held at the Government Guest House, Attached at Tab A is the third Chinese draft of the communiqué. See Document 56 for text of the draft. At Tab B is the final agreed tentative draft, which is printed in Foreign Relations, 1969-1972, volume XVII, China, 1969-1972, as an attachment to Document 165. The final version of the draft is in ibid., Document 203.


--  56. American and Chinese Drafts of the Joint Communiqué, Beijing, October 22-26, 1971 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Each nation submitted three drafts of the joint communiqué for President Nixon's visit to China.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 1035, Files for the President-China Material, China-HAK October 1971 Visit. No classification marking. All brackets in the source text. See Documents 165 and 203, Foreign Relations, 1969-1976, volume XVII, China, 1969-1972, for the final agreed tentative draft and final version of the communiqué


--  57. Note From the President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs (Haig) to the Military Attaché at the Embassy in France (Walters), Washington, October 30, 1971 and Memorandum for the Record, Paris, October 31, 1971, 6 p.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Haig transmitted three points, concerning President Nixon's visit, for Walters to make orally to the Chinese. Military Attaché Walters and Chinese Ambassador to France Huang Chen discussed how the new and growing relationship between the U.S. and China would benefit humankind.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, Oct 20, 1971-Dec 31, 1971. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Haig handwrote the addressee instructions, the date, and an additional "eyes only" classification on the note. No time of transmission or receipt appears on the note, but Walters subsequently indicated in his October 31 memorandum of record that he received the telegram at midnight and finished deciphering it at 3:30 a.m. The October 31 memorandum that Walters drafted does not bear any classification markings. The meeting was held at Chen's residence in Neuilly.


--  58. Memorandum for the Record, Paris, November 16, 1971 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Unable to arrange a meeting for November 15, Military Attaché Walters met with Chinese diplomat Chan Yung Chieh the next day. Walters informed him of President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger's upcoming visit and handed him the note expressing Kissinger's desire to meet with the Chinese in New York. Chieh indicated that he would transmit the note to Peking via "electrical means."

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, Oct 20, 1971-Dec 31, 1971. Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Drafted by Walters. The meeting was held at the Chinese Embassy.


--  59. Instructions to the Military Attaché at the Embassy in France (Walters), Washington, undated [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Walters was asked to request an appointment with the Chinese ambassador on November 15 and inform him that President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger would arrive in Paris on November 20 and wished to meet with Huang Chen at 9 a.m. that morning. An accompanying note, which Walters was to hand to the Chinese, inquired as to if the Chinese would be willing to meet secretly with Kissinger in New York after the Chinese delegation was seated at the United Nations.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, Oct 20, 1971-Dec 31, 1971. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Published from an unsigned copy. Attached is the note requesting the secret meeting between Chinese officials and Kissinger.


--  60. Memorandum for Record, Paris, November 18, 1971 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Chinese Ambassador to France Huang Chen told Military Attaché Walters that the Chinese wished to move the announcement of President Nixon's visit from November 23 to November 29.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, Oct 20, 1971-Dec 31, 1971. Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Drafted by Walters. A handwritten notation reads: "Lord." The meeting was held at Chen's residence in Neuilly. Although a precise time is not indicated on the memorandum, Walters indicates that the meeting was held during the morning of November 18.


--  61. Note From the President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs (Haig) to the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger), Washington, November 18, 1971 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Haig relayed Military Attaché Walters's information concerning the announcement of President Nixon's China trip.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, Oct 20, 1971-Dec 31, 1971. Top Secret; Sensitive.


--  62. Letter From the President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs (Haig) to the Military Attaché at the Embassy in France (Walters), Washington, November 19, 1971 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Haig instructed Walters to hand Chinese Ambassador to France Huang Chen two messages during Walters's November 20 meeting. The first message confirmed November 29 as the date for the announcement of President Nixon's trip. The second message contained Kissinger's comments on the present negotiating situation with North Vietnamese officials; Kissinger noted that the talks scheduled for November 20 in Paris would not take place.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, Oct 20, 1971-Dec 31, 1971. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Published from a copy that indicates Haig signed the original. Attached are the two messages.


--  63. Memorandum for the Record, Paris, November 20, 1971, 11:30 a.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Military Attaché Walters met with Chinese Ambassador to France Huang Chen in order to deliver the messages Haig had transmitted the previous day. Huang provided Walters with a Chinese written message concerning a potential meeting between Ambassador to the United Nations Huang Hua and Kissinger in New York.

Source: Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Kissinger Papers, Geopolitical Files-China, Chron, 1 September-29 December, 1971. Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Drafted by Walters. The meeting was held at the Chinese Embassy. Attached is the English-language version of the Chinese message, with the handwritten notation: "11/20/71."


--  64. Message From the Government of the People's Republic of China to the Government of the United States, undated [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

The message expressed the Chinese belief that the Indian Government was "interfering in Pakistan's internal affairs," and offered Chinese military and political support for Pakistan, in the event of an attack.

Source: Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Kissinger Papers, Geopolitical Files-China, Chron, 1 September-29 December, 1971. Secret; Sensitive; Exclusive Eyes Only. The message bears the handwritten notation: "11/20/71."


--  65. Checklist of Undertakings With the Government of the People's Republic of China, Washington, June 17, 1972 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

The checklist contained the circumstance, nature, and status of each undertaking between the two nations.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 87, Country Files, Far East, China, Commitments to the PRC [10/71-7/73]. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Sent for information. Lord transmitted the checklist to Kissinger and Haig under a March 17 covering memorandum. Lord updated the checklist by hand on June 17. The copy published here is the June 17 version of the checklist.


--  66. Memorandum for the Record, Washington, November 21, 1971 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

NSC staff member Winston Lord recounted that President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger had instructed him to telephone Chinese Ambassador Huang Hua in order to communicate a message from Kissinger. Lord also indicated that NSC staff member Commander Jonathan Howe would directly communicate the message on November 22.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, Oct 20, 1971-Dec 31, 1971. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Drafted by Lord on November 22. Huang Hua was staying at the Hotel Roosevelt in New York.


--  67. Memorandum for the Record, New York, November 22, 1971, 2-2:25 p.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

NSC staff member Howe met with Chinese Ambassador to the United Nations Huang Hua and agreed that Huang and President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger would meet the next evening at 10 p.m. They also discussed the visit of U.S. officials to China during the previous month.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, Oct 20, 1971-Dec 31, 1971. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Drafted by Howe. The meeting was held at the Hotel Roosevelt. The note is attached but not published.


--  68. Memorandum of Conversation, New York, November 23, 1971, 10-11:55 p.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger and Chinese Ambassador to the United Nations Huang Hua agreed to resist Indian military action against Pakistan and agreed on how they would handle the South Asian controversy in the United Nations Security Council. Kissinger also disavowed any U.S. involvement with the Formosan Independence Movement.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, Oct 20, 1971-Dec 31, 1971. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum. According to information contained in Document , the meeting was held in an unidentified apartment building in New York. Howe noted that it was not in an "affluent area but had been selected primarily to insure privacy." A typed notation on the memorandum of conversation indicates that the meeting was held on the East Side. For text of the draft UN Security Council resolution, see Document 69. For Kissinger's summary of this meeting, see Foreign Relations, 1969-1972, volume XVII, China, 1969-1972, Document 173.


--  69. Message From the United States Government to the Government of the People's Republic of China, Washington, November 29, 1971  [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

The message proposed the logistics and particulars for an advance trip prior to President Nixon's February 1972 visit. It also outlined approaches U.S. officials had made concerning the India-Pakistan situations.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, Oct 20, 1971-Dec 31, 1971. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Haig transmitted the message under a November 28 covering memorandum to Walters, requesting that Walters seek a meeting with Huang Chen on November 29 and indicating that Haig would provide him with an additional oral message for the Chinese. See Document 70 for information concerning the oral message. For the November 20 Chinese note, see Document 64. Attached is a copy of the United Nations Security Council resolution concerning the India-Pakistan crisis. Documentation on the India-Pakistan situation can be found in Foreign Relations, 1969-1976, volume XI, South Asia Crisis, 1971 and Foreign Relations, 1969-1976, volume E-7, Documents on South Asia, 1969-1972.


--  70. Memorandum for the Record, Paris, November 29, 1971, 5 p.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Military Attaché Walters relayed to Chinese Ambassador to France Huang Chen details of President Nixon's trip to China as well as Nixon's and his Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger's views on the Indo-Pakistan crisis to Chinese Ambassador to France Huang Chen.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, Oct 20, 1971-Dec 31, 1971. Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Drafted by Walters on November 30. The meeting was held at Chen's residence in Neuilly. For the message Walters delivered to the Chinese, see Document 69.


--  71. Memorandum for the Record, New York, December 3 and 4, 1971 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Commander Howe reported on his telephone calls and meetings with two Chinese diplomats: Wang Hai-jung and T'ang Wen-Sheng. Howe had been instructed to communicate to the Chinese that the Pakistani Government had left it up to the United States Government to determine whether or not to request a meeting of the United Nations Security Council.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, Oct 20, 1971-Dec 31, 1971. Top Secret; Sensitive; Eyes Only. Drafted by Howe. A handwritten notation indicates that Haig saw the memorandum. Attached at Tab A is the message outlining communication channels between the U.S. and China and the steps the United States was taking in order to diffuse the situation. Handwritten notes on the attached message read: "Delivered by Jon Howe to Miss Tang 10:15 pm, 12/13/71" and "Win Lord." For discussion of the communication channels agreed upon at the November 23 meeting, see Document 68. Attached at Tab B but not published is Howe's hand-written note, dictated by Haig on December 4.


--  72. Message From Nancy Oullette to the President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs (Haig), Paris, December 10, 1971 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Oullette indicated that Chinese officials had informed her that three Americans would be granted early release from their prison sentences and a fourth, convicted of espionage, would have his sentence reduced from life imprisonment to 5 years.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, Oct 20, 1971-Dec 31, 1971. Secret; Eyes Only. No time of transmission or receipt appears on the message. A handwritten notation reads: "Winston," in reference to Lord. Oullette served as Walters' secretary in Paris.


--  73. Message From the Government of the United States to the Government of the People's Republic of China, Washington, December 17, 1971 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

The message summarized the exchanges between the United States and Soviet Union concerning the India-Pakistan situation.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, Oct 20, 1971-Dec 31, 1971. No classification marking. A handwritten note reads, "Handed to Gen Walters 17 Dec 71 for delivery Dec 18."


--  74. Memorandum for the Record, Paris, December 18, 1971, 11 a.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Military Attaché Walters read Chinese Ambassador to France Huang Chen the text of the U.S. message regarding U.S. activities concerning the India-Pakistan situation.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, Oct 20, 1971-Dec 31, 1971. Secret; Sensitive; Exclusive; Eyes Only. Drafted by Walters on December 20. The meeting was held at Chen's residence in Neuilly.


--  75. Backchannel Message From the President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs (Haig) to the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger), Beijing, January 4, 1972 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Haig reported that Chinese Premier Chou En-lai blamed Soviet "meddling" in South Asia and Indochina on their anger at the Chinese-U.S. rapprochement and criticized Washington's continued bombing of North Vietnam.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 1015, Haig Special File, Haig China Trip File [Haig Advance Party, Dec. 29, 1971 to Jan. 10, 1972] [1 of 2]. Top Secret; Sensitive; Eyes Only.


--  76. Backchannel Message From the President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs (Haig) to the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger), Beijing, undated [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Haig communicated the fact that Chinese Premier Chou En-lai was willing to consider the U.S. views on Southeast Asia and that he had agreed to other aspects of President Nixon's visit.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 1037, Files for the President-China Material, China-AH January [1972] visit. Top Secret; Sensitive; Eyes Only.


--  77. Backchannel Message From the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger) to the President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs (Haig), Washington, undated [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

In reference to the joint communiqué, Kissinger informed Haig that it could be strengthened in terms of scientific and cultural exchanges. He also noted that with regards to South Asia, communication between the United States and China would take place via the Paris channel and that Haig should stress to the Chinese the U.S. readiness to accept a non-aligned Southeast Asia.

National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 1037, Files for the President-China Material, China-AH January [1972] visit. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. A typed notation indicated that the message was to be "delivered in sealed envelope directly to Gen. Haig." Kissinger wrote next to the reference number: "and your immediately following message with identifier 008."


--  78. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing January 6, 1972, 11 a.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs Haig, acting on Kissinger's instructions concerning the communiqué, informed Acting Chinese Foreign Minister Chi P'eng-fei that the United States wanted to strengthen trade, cultural, and scientific relations between the two nations and added that Moscow was blocking negotiated settlements in Indochina and South Asia.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 1037, Files for the President-China Material, China, Haig trip-memcons January 1972. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum. The meeting was held in the Great Hall of the People.


--  79. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, January 7, 1972, 11:45 p.m.  [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Chinese Premier Chou En-lai voiced the Chinese views concerning the joint communiqué, which President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs Haig indicated he would convey to President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger and President Nixon.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 1037, Files for the President-China Material, China, Haig trip-memcons, January 1972. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. The meeting was held in the Great Hall of the People. The memorandum is mistakenly dated January 7, 1971.


--  80. Letter From the President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs (Haig) to the Military Attaché at the Embassy in France (Walters), Washington, January 24, 1972 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Haig furnished instructions for documents Walters was asked to deliver to the Chinese ambassador on January 26.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, January 1-February 29, 1972. Top Secret; Sensitive; Eyes Only. The tabs are attached but not published. Walters' account of the January 26 meeting is Document 82.


--  81. Letter From the President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs (Haig) to the Military Attaché at the Embassy in France (Walters), Washington, January 25, 1972 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Haig instructed Walters to hand-deliver two messages to the Chinese, including a proposal for a negotiated settlement of the Vietnam war.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, January 1-February 29, 1972. Top Secret; Sensitive; Eyes Only. Tab I is the substitute version of an enclosure attached to a note at Tab A in Document 80. Tab II is attached but not published.


--  82. Memorandum for the Record, Paris, January 26, 1972, 7:30 p.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Military Attaché Walters handed the Chinese the U.S. proposal for Indochina.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, January 1-February 29, 1972. No classification marking. The meeting was held at Chen's residence in Neuilly. No drafting date appears on the memorandum. Walters added the handwritten notation "Provided" next to the sentence beginning with "He also said that they did not know. . ." For additional information about the attached tabs, see Document 80.


--  83. Memorandum for the Record, Paris, January 30, 1972 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Military Attaché Walters reported an "uncomfortable" meeting with Chinese Ambassador to France Huang Chen on January 30th in response to the January 26th U.S. proposal on Indochina.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, January 1-February 29, 1972. No classification marking. The meeting was held at Chen's residence in Neuilly. The meeting time is not indicated. A handwritten notation on the memorandum reads: "Win."


--  84. Memorandum for Record, Paris, February 1, 1972 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Military Attaché Walters reported that his meeting with the Chinese had been cordial, which was a marked change from his previous meeting.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, January 1-February 29, 1972. No classification marking. The meeting was held at Chen's residence in Neuilly. The meeting time is not indicated. A handwritten notation on the memorandum reads: "Win."


--  85. Memorandum for the Record, Paris, February 11, 1972, 4 p.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Additional discussion concerning the Chinese support for the North Vietnamese. President Nixon's reelection prospects were also mentioned.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, January 1-February 29, 1972. No classification marking. The meeting was held at Chen's residence in Neuilly.


--  86. Paper Prepared by the National Security Council Staff, Washington, undated [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

The paper provided a summary of Chairman of the Communist Party of China Mao Tse-tung's major philosophical and political themes and offered a brief history of China since the Communists assumed power in 1949.

Source: Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Kissinger Papers, Geopolitical Files, China, Trips, February 1972, Briefing Book. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Published from an undated draft. Kissinger transmitted the paper to Nixon under a February 15 covering memorandum. A handwritten note reads "Put in President's Mao/Chou book Feb. 15 AM." Tab A, Mao Tse-tung's 1949 article, is attached but not published. Brackets and ellipses are the source text.


--  87. Memorandum for the Record, Paris, February 17, 1972, 5 p.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Military Attaché Walters's meeting with the Chinese covered President Nixon's departure to China, Nixon's pursuit of an open dialogue with China, and U.S.-West German relations.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File-China Trip, China Exchanges, January 1-February 29, 1972. No classification marking. The meeting was held at Chen's residence in Neuilly.


--  88. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, February 21, 1972, 2:30-2:40 p.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger and Chinese Premier Chou En-lai briefly discussed the toasts each would give that evening at dinner.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 92, Country Files, Far East, China, Dr. Kissinger's Meetings in the People's Republic of China during the Presidential Visit, February 1972. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum; presumably drafted by Lord. Another set of these documents is ibid., President's Trip, February 1972, HAK Conversations. Unless noted otherwise, the versions are identical. The meeting was held at the President's Guest House, Beijing. All brackets are in the source text.


--  89. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, February 21, 1972, 4:15-5:30 p.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger explained that only Secretary of State Rogers had seen portions of the draft communiqué. Other Department of State officials were unaware of the specifics of Kissinger's discussion with Chinese Premier Chou En-lai.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 92, Country Files, Far East, China, Dr. Kissinger's Meetings in the People's Republic of China during the Presidential Visit, February 1972. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum, presumably Lord was the drafter. The meeting was held at the Guest House, Villa 2. All brackets and ellipses are in the source text.


--  90. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, February 22, 1972, 10:05-11:55 a.m.  [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger and Chinese Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Ch'iao Kuan-hua discussed the wording of the communiqué, specifically in relation to the South Asia crisis and the continuing dilemma over Taiwan. The main sticking point for Ch'iao remained Washington's unwillingness to withdraw all its troops from Taiwan. Kissinger responded that the U.S. was "confronting . . .a very complex domestic situation" in reference to the "China Lobby."

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 92, Country Files, Far East, China, Dr. Kissinger's Meetings in the People's Republic of China during the Presidential Visit, February 1972. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum, presumably drafted by Lord. The meeting was held at the Guest House, Villa 2.


--  91. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, February 22, 1972, 2 p.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Topics discussed at the first counterpart meeting between Secretary of State Rogers and Chinese Foreign Minister Chi P'eng-fei included normalization of relations, people-to-people exchanges, trade expansion, and Most Favored Nation status.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970-73, POL 7 US/NIXON. Secret; Nodis; Homer. Drafted by Nicholas Platt and approved in S on February 28. The meeting was held in the Sinkiang Room, Great Hall of the People. The third, fourth, and fifth counterpart meetings are published as Documents 94, 101, and 107. Part II is Document 198, Foreign Relations, 1969-1972, volume XVII, China, 1969-1972.


--  92. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing February 23, 1972, 9:35 a.m.-12:34 p.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger shared with Chinese Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Ch'iao Kuan-hua discussed the communiqué, confidential information on Soviet conventional and strategic weaponry, and the current status of U.S.-Soviet negotiations.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 92, Country Files, Far East, China, President's Trip, Feb 1972, HAK Conversations. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum. Ellipses in the source text. Also present on the Chinese side was Yeh Chien-ying, Vice Chairman of the Military Commission. The meeting was held at the Guest House, Villa 2. Tabs A-C are attached but not published.


--  93. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, February 24, 1972, 9:59 a.m.-12:42 p.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger and Chinese Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Ch'iao Kuan-hua continued to discuss the communiqué. Kissinger informed Ch'iao that the U.S. Ambassador to France, a close friend of President Nixon's, would replace Walters and maintain the secret Paris channel.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 92, Country Files, Far East, Dr. Kissinger's Meetings in the People's Republic of China during the Presidential Visit, February 1972. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum; presumably drafted by either Lord or Howe. The meeting was held at the Guest House, Villa 2.


--  94. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, February 24, 1972, 3 p.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

During the third counterpart meeting between Secretary of State Rogers and Chinese Foreign Minister Chi P'eng-fei, Chi attributed the "lack of tranquility" in the world to U.S. post-World War II policies and Soviet intervention. He stressed that easing international tensions required respect for the five principles of peaceful co-existence. Rogers, in turn, provided a different version of the world situation. The two officials also discussed Vietnam and Cambodia.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970-73, POL 7 US/NIXON. Secret; Nodis; Homer. Drafted by Calvin Mehlert and approved in S on March 3. Copies were sent to S, U, J, EA, S/S, and Kissinger. The meeting was held in the Sinkiang Room, Great Hall of the People. Eliot sent the memorandum to Rogers under a March 3 covering note. Rogers subsequently approved the memorandum.


--  95. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, February 24, 1972, 3:30-3:45 p.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger and Chinese Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Chi'iao Kuan-hua discussed aspects of the communiqué, specifically the wording concerning the relationship between Taiwan and China.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 92, Country Files, Far East, China, Dr. Kissinger's Meetings in the People's Republic of China during the Presidential Visit, February 1972. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum; presumably drafted by either Lord or Howe. The meeting was held at the Guest House, Villa 2.


--  96. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, February 25, 1972, 12:50-1:15 a.m. [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Chinese Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Ch'iao Kuan-hua and President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger continued to debate the semantics of the communiqué as they applied to Taiwan.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 92, Country Files, Far East, China, Dr. Kissinger's Meetings in the People's Republic of China during the Presidential Visit, February 1972. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. The meeting was held at the Guest House, Villa 2, Beijing.


--  97. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, February 25, 1972, 9:34-10:58 a.m.  [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger and Chinese Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Ch'iao Kuan-hua returned to the issue of the specific wording of U.S. withdrawal of forces from Taiwan.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 92, Country Files, Far East, China, Dr. Kissinger's Meetings in the People's Republic of China during the Presidential Visit, February 1972. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum; presumably drafted by either Lord or Howe. Brackets and ellipses in the source text. The meeting was held at the Guest House, Villa 2.


--  98. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, February 25, 1972, 2:35-2:45 p.m.  [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

Discussions resumed on the Taiwan portions of the communiqué.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 92, Country Files, Far East, China, Dr. Kissinger's Meetings in the People's Republic of China during the Presidential Visit, February 1972. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum; presumably drafted by either Lord or Howe. The meeting was held at the Guest House, Villa 2.


--  99. Memorandum of Conversation, Beijing, February 25, 1972, 3:35-4 p.m.  [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ] 

President's Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger resisted the phrase "final withdrawal" in relation to Taiwan because it would appear that the administration had made too many concessions to China.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 92, Country Files, Far East, China, Dr. Kissinger's Meetings in the People's Republic of China during the Presidential Visit, February 1972. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No drafting information appears on the memorandum; presumably drafted by either Lord or Howe. The meeting was held at the Guest House, Villa 2.


  
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