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Media Note
Office of the Spokesman
Washington, DC
December 31, 2008


Office of the Historian, Bureau of Public Affairs Release of Foreign Relations, 1969-1976, Volume E-14, Part 1, Documents on the United Nations, 1973-1976

The Department of State released today Foreign Relations of the United States, 1969–1976, Volume E–14, Part 1, Documents on the United Nations, 1973–1976, as an electronic-only publication. (Part 2, Arms Control topics, will be published at a later date.) This volume is the latest publication in the subseries of the Foreign Relations series that documents the most important decisions and actions of the foreign policy of the administrations of Presidents Richard M. Nixon and Gerald R. Ford. Volume E–14 is available to all, free of charge on the Internet. Approximately 25 percent of the volumes scheduled for publication for the 1969–1976 subseries, covering the Nixon and Nixon–Ford administrations, will be in this format.

This volume documents United States Government decision making concerning food policy, population control, and women’s issues. This volume also covers matters pertaining to representation in the United Nations and related international bodies, as well as other United Nations-related issues during the Nixon and Ford administrations. Additional global issues with United Nations-related aspects, including Antarctic resource exploitation, international drug control, human rights, oceans policy, space and telecommunications, and terrorism, are covered in Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume E–3, Documents on Global Issues, 1973–1976.

The United States played an important role in three major conferences that met under United Nations auspices during this period. Concerns about a worldwide “population explosion” prompted nations to gather in Bucharest for the 1974 World Population Conference to consider how to address the problems posed by overpopulation. The United States advocated population limitation policies in the hope of reducing demands on global resources and increasing stability abroad. In response to alarm caused by global food supply shortages as well as longer-term concerns about population, governments also met in Rome at the 1974 World Food Conference. The United States supported a variety of mechanisms for increasing food security and food production worldwide. In order to address long-term population/food supply issues, U.S. officials and many others concluded it was also necessary to examine women’s rights issues. In a cacophonous, signal event, the 1975 World Conference of the International Women’s Year met in Mexico City. It represented a heightened level of concern for women’s issues on the international stage.

After successfully negotiating the admission to the United Nations of the People’s Republic of China, the Federal Republic of Germany, and the German Democratic Republic, United States officials encountered what they considered to be increasing politicization of the General Assembly and other international organizations. The Nixon and Ford administrations opposed attempts to expel Israel, South Africa, Portugal, the Republic of South Vietnam, and the Lon Nol government of Cambodia (the Khmer Republic) from the U.N. The U.S. Government also supported, unsuccessfully, the entry of the Republic of Korea. U.S. representatives worked diligently to oppose the admission of the Palestine Liberation Organization and North Vietnamese representatives to the General Assembly. Finally, concerns about increasing politicization in international functional and technical organizations, such as the International Labor Organization and the International Civil Aviation Organization, led the Nixon and Ford administrations to reconsider U.S. membership in certain international bodies. A final chapter indicates the general outline of U.S. policy with regard to the wide variety of issues dealt with in the United Nations General Assembly and associated bodies.

The volume, including a preface, list of names, abbreviations, sources, annotated document list, and this press release are available at the Office of the Historian website (http://www.history.state.gov). For further information, email history@state.gov.

2008/1107


Released on December 31, 2008

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