U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
Other State Department Archive SitesU.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
Home Issues & Press Travel & Business Countries Youth & Education Careers About State Video

Addresses the Parade of Pink at the 19th Annual Susan G. Komen National Race for the Cure

Secretary Condoleezza Rice
Washington, DC
June 7, 2008

SECRETARY RICE: Good morning. Good morning. Thank you. It’s so great to see all of you out there today. I want to thank my good friend Nancy Brinker, as we call her now, Ambassador Brinker, who is just an inspiration to all of us for her dedication, for her desire to have this world free of breast cancer.

As Nancy said, it is indeed a personal matter for me. I can remember very well in 1970 being a little bit disturbed when my father was a little late picking me up from school at St. Mary’s Academy. And then he got later and he got later. And finally, when he picked me up, I learned that he was late because he’d been with my mother at the doctor as she was being diagnosed as having breast cancer. And this little 15-year-old girl was suddenly really terrified. I didn’t know what to expect. And at that time few people talked about it in 1970.

Thank God, my mom lived another 15 years -- (applause) -- and the difference for me was, of course, immense. Because instead of losing my mom as a 15-year-old girl, it was still hard at 30, but at least she got to see me as a fully grown woman, a professor at Stanford, and well on my way. And that’s why it is so important to have life-sustaining as one of our goals. But we have much bigger goals, and that is to prevent the disease, and ultimately to cure it for those who get it. (Applause.)

We are a long way from 1985 when my mom died. Looking out there at all of the survivors, I know we are a long way from 1985. And it’s because this is an effort that has touched and inspired people here in our country and is now touching and inspiring people around the world. I’m told today that we have 32 embassies participating in this race. (Applause.) And as Nancy said, First Lady Laura Bush and Nancy are leading a global effort. We’ve had breast cancer awareness in the Middle East, breast cancer awareness in Latin America. We want all women, worldwide, to be able to talk about their disease, to work to cure their disease, and to feel that they’ve got friends, and a friend in the United States of America in doing it.

But I want to bring it back home, because all of the national efforts and all of the global efforts, and these great efforts and inspirations that we’re seeing today, it still comes down to one woman, it stills comes down to a mom or to a daughter or to a grandmother, it still comes down to a wife or to a sister or to a friend next door. There are very, very few who’ve not been touched in some way by breast cancer. And so as we raise this great national and international movement, let us not lose sight of what this means for one woman: one woman who will survive, one woman who will be cured, and one woman who will go on to do great things for her family and for others.

Thank you very, very much. (Applause.)

 



  Back to top

U.S. Department of State
USA.govU.S. Department of StateUpdates  |   Frequent Questions  |   Contact Us  |   Email this Page  |   Subject Index  |   Search
The Office of Electronic Information, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department. External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.
About state.gov  |   Privacy Notice  |   FOIA  |   Copyright Information  |   Other U.S. Government Information

Published by the U.S. Department of State Website at http://www.state.gov maintained by the Bureau of Public Affairs.