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 You are in: Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security > Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation (ISN) > Releases > Fact Sheets > 2002
Fact Sheet
Bureau of Nonproliferation
Washington, DC
May 14, 2002

U.S.- lAEA Additional Protocol

In September 2001, President Bush told the member states of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) that the "IAEA is central to the world's efforts to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons" and that "we will look to the IAEA to continue serving as a critical instrument to help combat the real and growth threat of nuclear proliferation." To strengthen the hand of the IAEA, on May 9 the President sent to the Senate for its advice and consent to ratification the U.S.-IAEA Additional Protocol to the U.S.-IAEA Safeguards Agreement, which entered into force in 1980. The Additional Protocol is designed to improve the Agency's ability to detect clandestine nuclear weapons programs in non-nuclear weapons states by providing the IAEA with increased information about and expanded access to nuclear fuel cycle activities and sites.

Implementation of Additional Protocols, based on the Model Additional Protocol issued by the IAEA, in non-nuclear weapon states will improve international confidence that non-nuclear weapon State Parties to the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons are not misusing nuclear materials to develop nuclear weapons and to reduce further the risk of nuclear proliferation. The Model Additional Protocol is designed to provide the IAEA with increased information about and expanded access to their nuclear fuel cycle activities and sites.

While under no obligation to do so, the United States negotiated and signed an Additional Protocol with the IAEA. On May 9, 2002, the President submitted that Protocol to the Senate for its advice and consent to ratification. By taking this step, the Administration underscores U.S. commitment to combating the potential spread of nuclear weapons, as well as demonstrates that that adherence to the Model Protocol does not place other countries at a commercial disadvantage. The U.S. Additional Protocol is identical to that which non-nuclear weapons states are being asked to accept, with the exception that that the U.S. Protocol does not obligate the United States to apply the Protocol to activities or locations of direct national security significance to the United States.

For many years, the United States has championed IAEA programs to improve nuclear safety and security and to foster the contribution of nuclear technology to sustainable development. U.S. funding and expertise are used to maintain and strengthen IAEA monitoring of nuclear programs worldwide, to ensure the best possible nuclear safety practices, and to meet human needs through improved agricultural, medical and basic industrial applications of nuclear techniques.

Since September 11, the IAEA has taken on an expanded role in countering the risk of nuclear terrorism. The United States is committed to working with the IAEA and its other member states to enhance nuclear material security and to reduce the risk that any nuclear or other radioactive material could fall into the hands of terrorists.  

Status of Additional Protocols

The following 61 States have signed IAEA Additional Protocols, 25 of these have brought their Protocols into force.

State

Board Approval

Date signed

In Force

1.

Andorra

7 Dec 2000

9 Jan 2001

 

2.

Armenia

23 Sept 1997

29 Sept 1997

 

3.

Australia

23 Sept 1997

23 Sept 1997

12 Dec 1997

4.

Austria1

11 June 1998

22 Sept 1998

*

5.

Azerbaijan

7 June 2000

5 July 2000

29 Nov 2000

6.

Bangladesh

25 Sept 2000

30 Mar 2001

30 Mar 2001

7.

Belgium1

11 June 1998

22 Sept 1998

 

8.

Bulgaria

14 Sept 1998

24 Sept 1998

10 Oct 2000

9.

Canada

11 June 1998

24 Sept 1998

8 Sept 2000

10.

China

25 Nov 1998

31 Dec 1998

28 March 2002

11.

Costa Rica

29 Nov 2001

12 Dec 2001

 

12.

Croatia

14 Sept 1998

22 Sept 1998

6 July 2000

13.

Cuba

20 Sept 1999

15 Oct 1999

 

14.

Cyprus

25 Nov 1998

29 July 1999

 

15.

Czech Republic

20 Sept 1999

28 Sept 1999

 

16.

Denmark1

11 June 1998

22 Sept 1998

 

17.

Ecuador

20 Sept 1999

1 Oct 1999

24 Oct 2001

18.

Estonia

21 March 2000

13 April 2000

 

19.

Finland1

11 June 1998

22 Sept 1998

*

20.

France1

11 June 1998

22 Sept 1998

 

21.

Georgia

23 Sept 1997

29 Sept 1997

 

22.

Germany1

11 June 1998

22 Sept 1998

*

23.

Ghana

11 June 1998

12 June 1998

provisional

24.

Greece1

11 June 1998

22 Sept 1998

*

25.

Guatemala

29 Nov 2001

14 Dec 2001

 

26.

Haiti

20 March 2002

   

27.

Holy See

14 Sept 1998

24 Sept 1998

24 Sept 1998

28.

Hungary

25 Nov 1998

26 Nov 1998

4 April 2000

29.

Indonesia

20 Sept 1999

29 Sept 1999

29 Sept 1999

30.

Ireland1

11 June 1998

22 Sept 1998

 

31.

Italy1

11 June 1998

22 Sept 1998

 

32.

Japan

25 Nov 1998

4 Dec 1998

16 Dec 1999

33.

Jordan

18 March 1998

28 July 1998

28 July 1998

34.

Latvia

7 Dec 2000

12 July 2001

12 July 2001

35.

Lithuania

8 Dec 1997

11 March 1998

5 July 2000

36.

Luxembourg1

11 June 1998

22 Sept 1998

 

37.

Monaco

25 Nov 1998

30 Sept 1999

30 Sept 1999

38.

Mongolia

11 Sept 2001

5 Dec 2001

 

39.

Namibia

21 March 2000

22 March 2000

 

40.

Netherlands1

11 June 1998

22 Sept 1998

*

41.

New Zealand

14 Sept 1998

24 Sept 1998

24 Sept 1998

42.

Nigeria

7 June 2000

20 Sept 2001

 

43.

Norway

24 March 1999

29 Sept 1999

16 May 2000

44.

Panama

29 Nov 2001

11 Dec 2001

11 Dec 2001

45.

Peru

10 Dec 1999

22 March 2000

23 July 2001

46.

Philippines

23 Sept 1997

30 Sept 1997

 

47.

Poland

23 Sept 1997

30 Sept 1997

5 May 2000

48.

Portugal1

11 June 1998

22 Sept 1998

*

49.

Republic of Korea

24 March 1999

21 June 1999

 

50.

Romania

9 June 1999

11 June 1999

7 July 2000

51.

Russia

21 March 2000

22 March 2000

 

52.

Slovakia

14 Sept 1998

27 Sept 1999

 

53.

Slovenia

25 Nov 1998

26 Nov 1998

22 Aug 2000

54.

Spain1

11 June 1998

22 Sept 1998

*

55.

Sweden1

11 June 1998

22 Sept 1998

*

56.

Switzerland

7 June 2000

16 June 2000

 

57.

Turkey

7 June 2000

6 July 2000

17 July 2001

58.

Ukraine

7 June 2000

15 Aug 2000

 

59.

United Kingdom1

11 June 1998

22 Sept 1998

*

60.

United States of America

11 June 1998

12 June 1998

 

61.

Uruguay

23 Sept 1997

29 Sept 1997

 

62.

Uzbekistan

14 Sept 1998

22 Sept 1998

21 Dec 1998

TOTALS

 

62

61

25

The IAEA BOG approved the IAEA-EURATOM Additional Protocol on June 11, 1998, and it was signed on September 22, 1998.

1 All 15 EU States have concluded Additional Protocols with EURATOM and the Agency.

*The Agency has received notification from these States that they have fulfilled their own internal requirements for entry into force. The AP will enter into force on the date when the Agency receives written notification from the EU States and EURATOM that their respective requirements for entry into force have been met.



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